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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, new here to the forums but you guys seem to have a vast amount of knowledge of these firearms and I could use some. My local gun shop could only say it was an old Mauser which wasn't terribly helpful.

My dad recently passed away and he left me many of his dad's old firearms including this one. I know next to nothing about antique firearms.

What is it? It has virtually no information listed on it aside from numbers; also, most of the numbers don't seem to match so is it maybe a franken-gun, pieced together? All of the other's I was able to figure out via serial numbers etc but this one remains a mystery.

I did some research and it looks somewhat similar to the 1916 Spanish Mauser but doesn't seem to be one, as the barrel etc. is a lot different, as is the sight.
Any help would be appreciated!
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It's a sporterized Spanish 1893 or 1895, these were made for Spain under contract by Germany. The receiver you have is a very good one and will serve another lifetime of hunting and shooting. The downside to this rifle is it isn't very valuable. It is a small ring mauser not the more popular large ring k98. Value is somewhere between $100 and $150 depending on the bore condition and who wants it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the fantastic response. I assume since it's been sporterized it's not even close to original anymore, hence the mismatch numbers? Also, what caliber is it (or should be at least)? Also, how can I tell if it's 1895 or 1893?
 

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Most were in 7mm if I remember correctly. Some later models were also .308. As 338RUM stated it's an 1893 to 1895 based on the rear sight.
 

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Look at the bottom front of the bolt. 1893 is flat, 1895 is round. Barrel looks fine, it just needs a stock.
A gunsmith can determine the caliber, by doing a cerrocast of the chamber.
 
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Most were in 7mm if I remember correctly. Some later models were also .308. As 338RUM stated it's an 1893 to 1895 based on the rear sight.
No sir! Those pre Model 1898 Spanish Mauser's were chambered for the 1st version of the 7.62mm CETME cartridge which is the same as .308 Winchester and 7.62x51 mm Nato cartridge!!!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.62×51mm_CETME
 

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My knowledge of Spanish Mausers is hazy. I know that the FR-7 and the FR-8 were Mausers reworked to 7.62 NATO and a different bayonet mount as part of the Spanish Army's transition to the CETME from the Mausers, but I thought those were manufactured later than the 1890s. This isn't one of those, I know that much. Wasn't 7mm Mauser the Spanish standard until they went to 7.62 NATO in the 1950s?

I totally agree with getting a chamber cast to determine the caliber for sure. It costs a bit, but it's much safer than trying a bunch of cartridges to see which one chambers and fires properly!
 
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The Spanish FR7 and FR8 Mausers, small ring and large ring respectively, were intended to familiarize troops with the CETME rifle, until production caught up so all troops could be equipped with the CETME. The tube beneath the FR7 and FR8 barrel resembles the CETME tube, but actually holds some cleaning tools and the bayont lug. The bolt action rifles also have the same flash hider as the CETME.
All commercially sold CETME rifles sold by Century and others are built from Modelo C parts kits, thus are intended for full power 7.62X51 cartridge, though the Spanish Santa Barbara ammo does NOT carry the NATO circle-cross stamp. Neither does Aussie ammo for that matter. My CETME Sporter likes both.
When I had my FR8, I shot standard 7.62X51 in it with never a problem. Remember, this is the stronger large ring action.
I handload lighter loads for my M1916 rifle, to keep from having any problems with the small ring action. I would do the same with an FR7.
 
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Big Dog, my understanding is that they were rebored and rebarreled vintage bolt actions. The FR-8 was rebuilt from Spanish Model 98s in 8mm Mauser (Gewehr 98Ks in all but name), and the FR-7 from Model 93s in 7x57 Mauser, which was the Spanish standard at the time of the Spanish-American War.

I understood that the story was, when the Spanish Army adopted the CETME as their main battle rifle, they didn't have enough to equip everyone from the git-go. So the active-duty infantry regiments got the new Spanish Ladies first, and the other military & civil units, from the reserves, to the police, to the Navy and the Air Force, got FR-8s (the Air Force) and FR-7s (everyone else). Existing stocks of bolt actions were taken back to the arsenal, rebored, rebarreled, and with a tube for cleaning gear whose cap is the bayonet mount for a standard CETME bayo installed in the forearm. The idea was to get everyone familiar with the shorter-barreled CETME and its sights so the new rifles would feel familiar when enough were made so everyone had the same thing in their hands.

I've wanted an FR-7 for years; never have even seen one in a gun shop. I heard that when they got here, they were snapped up as instant deer rifles really quickly.
 
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Exactly so, as I said. Those FR7 and FR8 rifles were rebarreled converts.
The barrels were NOT CETME barrels as some think. On my laptop I have a pic of both barrels side by side, and they are quite different. The FR8 was originally an M43 rifle, compatible with the Kar98k. My M43 Airforce Model (sometimes erroneously called "M44") now wears a Kar98k triggerguard/magazine housing. Original was damaged.
Much of my CETME info comes directly from Spanish army veterans who carried the rifles in service, and from original Spanish published info.
 
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You have a Model 1895. Could be a Chilean rifle but crest looks like it is worn or gone from your receiver.
 
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