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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all. Was just going to see if I could pry the knowledge banks of all that look to get an opinion on this rifle. It appears to be a Spanish Mauser. Stamped on the receiver is Fabrica De Armas Oviedo 1907. The rear sight is a flip up style, with an aperture that rises and lowers from what is marked on the flip up 4 and the highest increment is 20. I am guessing that is in meters x 100. I am guessing this is a non numbers matching gun. The bolt, receiver and magazine plate all have different numbers on them.

So I was wondering what you all thought about it. If they are reputable, or if this is something that should just be put in the closet and not shot. I wouldn't guess it is high value due to the lack of numbers matching. I have researched a little a while back and saw sometimes Spanish Mauser metal was not of great quality. I don't know for sure. I have never shot this, and still don't know what caliber it is. Thats the primary reason why I have yet to shoot it. Don't plan on it until I figure it out.

I can post more pictures if there are requests. But for now, this is the only one I have, and it wouldn't be until tomorrow I can get more pics up because I work from 9-5 tonight to tomorrow morning. Anything helps, thanks for looking.



Here are some more pics so hopefully more can be said about it. I tried the best I could to get them to focus, but my camera is pretty old.










 

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This could be either a '93 or '95 Spanish. First and formost, have a competent gunsmith check it out for headspace and function just to be safe. You should also have them do a chamber casting. The '93's were chambered in 7x57, it gets a little sticky with the '95's. They were originaly 7x57 but some were converted to 8x57 just prior to WWII, then there are the ones which were converted to 7.62 NATO.
There is no way you could convince me to ever fire one of the 7.62 rifles. Granted, 7.62 NATO is lower pressure than .308 Winchester, but one never knows what conditions surplus ammo may have been stored under.
If you can, post pic's of the bottom of the bolt head and the left side of the receiver, this will help identify it. There were '93's, early '95's and late '95's.
 

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With the mix match of parts it's kinda' tough to nail this one down.
The bolt head (that flat spot on the bottom) and the rear sight increment markings bear it out as an M93 Rifle.
There were three different classifications of Mauser rifles. In the Spanish 93/95's there were rifles, short rifles and carbines. The barrel lengths were 29.06", 21.75" and 17.56" respectively.

Something I just now thought of, check the barrel just behind the front sight base to see if there is a small stamping. If this is a modern time import rifle the importer would have had to stamp the company initials as well as calibre on it. Might be anywhere on the barrel, but that is the normal place.

Again, if you decide you want to shoot this have a good gunsmith check the head-space as well as check the function. He/she will also be able to verify the calibre with a chamber casting. It's worth the small expense to be safe.

I also need to make a correction. Some of the Spanish M95's were converted to 7.62 CETME, not NATO as I previously stated.
 
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