Gun and Game Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My two current dogs are very old and I've been thinking about what kind of puppy to get as a replacement when they go on to the big kennel in the sky. Given that I feel we are looking at a SHTF situation any day, I'm basing choice of dog breed on things that would be important if that happened.
Hunting: if it's bad, dog food won't be available. Dog would probably have to rustle some of its own grub as well as help hunt creatures I could eat.
Guarding: don't want a vicious attack dog, but it would have to be able to sound an alarm if somebody came skulking around. You also wouldn't want a dog that's instant best friends with strangers.
Common sense: dog would have to be able to operate on its own at times if the people are involved elsewhere.
I have had Great Pyrenees and they are excellent guardian dogs, but don't hunt. Rat Terriers are great hunters but too small to hold their own against coyotes or feral dogs. I feel like Labs and Goldens are too friendly for their own good sometimes, and the herding breeds are smart but have no hunting instinct. My research is suggesting some kind of raccoon hound like a Bluetick or Redbone or possibly some kind of cur might work. I know these are what a lot of people in the past had on farms.
Thoughts? Sorry if this is posted elsewhere, I'm new and this is something I have been curious about for a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Oakleaf, interesting points. Most everyone living out here in the country has dogs. Kirby, our lab's main function is to alert us to trucks and people in our area. She is mostly inside or where ever we are on the property. We resqued her out of the pound at about 10 to 12 weeks of age. Talk about a total bond with us. Kirby is 10 years old so we will enjoy her company these last 2 or 3 years. I would like to get another pup and let Kirby kind'a train her as I hope the new dog would mirror Kirby's temperment. I am thinking of a yellow lab, large enough to be a issue if crossed yet the temperment to protect. This dog will not be trained to hunt. We are different than most people when it comes to SHTF, we are staying put. Back in the 1990's I read books by Mel Tappan and directly and indirectly I fashioned my life by his writtings. We are located about 100 miles from a major city and living out in the country we have bought meat on the hoof and butchered it ourselves.
 

·
The outer edge of civilization
Joined
·
16,970 Posts
I've got a Great Pyrenees myself and couldn't ask for a better dog. He's in training to be my service dog and after that I'll be training him to pull a cart. I know I'm not going to be able to carry things in the future, but if he can that'll be a big help.

Great Pyrs are terrific guardians for sure and will take on anything that endangers what the Pyr feels is "his", from goats, sheep and cattle to their humans. They're terrific alarm dogs as well. The other nice thing is they can look scary as heck if need be. Or at least mine can. Then again, he's got some serious human aggression and resource guarding issues we're working through. Sadly, I'm one of the resources he's really intent on guarding which is complicating his service dog training...sigh...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,539 Posts
border collie.
you just gotta train them.
i have one that's half, she doesn't 'hunt' so good.
but will tree a squirrel, stand on a bird i shoot till i get there, and sees stuff i don't.

she's only like 30 lbs. and could live on a half cup of dog food and whatever you throw her at dinner for 20 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
I have an older Irish Wolfhound who is a great protector of the family, she is 130 lbs of nobody is coming into the yard or house unless my wife or I invite them. She lets us know when someone is several houses down the road from us, but giant breeds can have health issues and don't live long. The Beagle/English Setter mix would just roll over and want you to rub her belly.

Just going through my list of dogs over the years. Beagle, Poodle, Chow, Irish Setter, Doberman, Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, English Setter, Weimaraner, Beagle/English Setter mix and the Wolfhound. (There is a bird / hunting dog trend)

If I were going to go back and pick any of the breeds that I've had it would be the Weimaraner. I had a pair of them, they would work well together to be protective. One would come from the front of strangers and the other would circle around behind them. There was no sneaking up on the house. they can operate on their own, not too big, not too small and do well with the family but weary of strangers. They will hunt with you or on their own and take care of themselves if needed. (They wreaked havoc on opossums and racoons at the bird feeders) One of ours was a rescue dog that had been dumped by someone. It took them the better part of 2 weeks to finally catch her while she was running on her own in the country.

Just my two cents from a long life with many different breeds, but I'm sure there will be 100 different opinions. Asking about dogs is almost like going down road of what's the best gun question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
I've got a Great Pyrenees myself and couldn't ask for a better dog. He's in training to be my service dog and after that I'll be training him to pull a cart. I know I'm not going to be able to carry things in the future, but if he can that'll be a big help.

Great Pyrs are terrific guardians for sure and will take on anything that endangers what the Pyr feels is "his", from goats, sheep and cattle to their humans. They're terrific alarm dogs as well. The other nice thing is they can look scary as heck if need be. Or at least mine can. Then again, he's got some serious human aggression and resource guarding issues we're working through. Sadly, I'm one of the resources he's really intent on guarding which is complicating his service dog training...sigh...
Yep. Had some neighbors that had a Great Pyrenees when I was a kid. Sweet, loyal, built like a tank, and a great watchdog. But ready to play when playtime comes. "Sebastian" was bit leery of me when I first was introduced to him but after my neighbors let him know I was OK, I was a trusted friend. Really a great dog. Only one thing... poops the size of a Sasquatch!! Man, I never saw a dog drop a turd like he could!!!:poop:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have had Great Pyrenees in the past and they were great dogs. I do want another, but also want a somewhat smaller but not really small dog (if that makes sense). I also live on land in the country and would stay put if SHTF. The problem I've had with herding dogs is they always want to herd my horse...when I am trying to ride him. I had looked at Siberian Huskies and Alaskan Malamutes, but from what I read they can't be trusted around chickens even with extensive training. That may not be accurate, I don't know. Most dog breed sites seem aimed only at pet owners and ignore the people who have working dogs. There's a lot of difference in the behavior of a dog that's in an apartment all day and a dog that's on a farm running around. I've had hip dysplasia and other problems with the really popular breeds I've had like Labs and Border Collies, so that was also why I'm more interested in the less common breeds.
 

·
The outer edge of civilization
Joined
·
16,970 Posts
I grew up with a Weimaraner from the time I was about 6 months old. He was a great dog for many reasons. He could hunt all day long, come home and protect the house and family and do it all over again the next day. Matt was loving, fun loving and actually had a wicked sense of humor. He really enjoyed "smiling" at service techs when they came to the door.

On the negative side, they can be hard headed and stubborn. Once they get the clue about what you want, they can become obsessive about it. When ours was sent out for field dog training, he really loved the go factor. In order to try to slow him down the trainer had him dragging tractor tires. When that didn't work, the trainer tried sections of phone pole. That was didn't work either, so the trainer got the "bright idea" to tie the dog off to his saddle, thinking if the dog started to go, the horse would slow him down by standing still. Talk about an epic fail! Matt (the dog) hit the end of the rope and kept going. The girth on the saddle broke, the trainer went flying one way and the horse took off another. Matt just kept going looking for birds, dragging the saddle behind him.

They can become a one person dog to the point they'll attack other family members if they don't like what's going on with "their person". My father was attacked several times by the dog when he crossed the line "disciplining" (read beating the heck out of me) me.

Health issues are a concern as well. They're prone to torsion if you're not extremely careful about how much and how often you feed them, as well as how fast they eat. Torsion is when the stomach rolls, cutting off the in and out flow. Gas builds up, it's extremely painful and if you don't get the dog into surgery within an hour of the stomach flipping, the dog will die.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,539 Posts
there's always the option of a solar powered robot dog..

one that most people overlook is the chessie. [chesapeake retriever]
strong, they hunt well, don't mess with stuff [other than stuff you can throw] can hang out outside in some seriously extreme weather without any ill affects, and do great with little kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,170 Posts
I had a Sheppard Collie mix growing up named Sweetie. Outstanding watch dog, best friend ever, was my partner everytime we went hiking, hunting, or trekking acoss wide open spaces in the southwesten hills around Santa Fe NM.. She hated cats, rabbits, lizards and snakes. She passed while I was in the military overseas. I have never owned another dog but hope to see her again when I cross the river.
 

·
The outer edge of civilization
Joined
·
16,970 Posts

Great Pyrenees are very smart and good at guarding their flock. But they eat a LOT!
Actually they don't. Benjen eats 2-3 cups a day and is in great physical condition at 110 lbs. Pyrs don't do a whole lot of physical activity unless they perceive a threat. Then it's an incredible burst of energy and back to being a slug when it's over.

A 4o lb bag of Diamond Lamb and Rice lasts about a month and a half with him. The better the quality food you feed, the better the nutrition and the less they need to eat to be in good body condition.
 

·
Registered
Several
Joined
·
96 Posts
Yes, Great Pyrenees don't eat as much or perform as much physical activity as you would think. If there's a varmint after the chickens or goats, back when I had goats, they would run it off or kill it, depending on what it was, and then go lie down in the shade.
We have 5 Great Pyrenees in our goat pastures. They are not pets. With that many it seems like a lot to keep them fed. Our border collie is a lot less
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
Health issues are a concern as well. They're prone to torsion if you're not extremely careful about how much and how often you feed them, as well as how fast they eat. Torsion is when the stomach rolls, cutting off the in and out flow. Gas builds up, it's extremely painful and if you don't get the dog into surgery within an hour of the stomach flipping, the dog will die.
We've always had any breeds with deep chest or large breeds stomachs tacked so that they won't flip or twist. Our Weims were pretty fearless and protective of the children when they were little. They can be high energy but much less than a German Short Hair or some other bird dog breeds that I've spent time around. You're correct, they are very smart and sometimes too smart for their own good, but I have no doubt they would have protected me to their death if someone started to harm anyone in our house.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top