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Discussion Starter #1
I want to buy a .270 for moose hunting. A want a bolt action, and it is a toss up between the X-Bolt Medallion or Tikka T3 Hunter. I think the Browning looks better, but I hear the T3 has such a nice action. But, I would also like to know how the X-Bolt action compares to the T3 as well.

Thanks
 

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Personally,

I feel that in the field, so to speak, you probably will not experience much if in fact any difference in performance.

I suggest handling each rifle to determine what is best for you in terms of fit, balance, pointability, etc.

If you really pushed it I would probably say the Tikka gets the advantage due to the SAKO barrel. Again, this is more to bench rest results than in the field where you have many variables such as your own excitement, perhaps a not so optimal shooting position, wind gusts hitting you, moving target, etc.

I am a little surprised about your choice of the .270 for such a large animal. Have you considered some perhaps more game appropriate cartridges? That is not so say the .270 will not do the job - just that I feel it is a little light for the job at hand.

Best wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I can't speak for the Tikka, but I own a Xbolt Medallion and love it. After owning a rifle with a polymer magazine, I would never want a medal one again. It is so smooth going in and out.
That is one beautiful gun. It is no doubt the X-Bolt is the sharpest of the 2
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I feel that in the field, so to speak, you probably will not experience much if in fact any difference in performance.

I suggest handling each rifle to determine what is best for you in terms of fit, balance, pointability, etc.

If you really pushed it I would probably say the Tikka gets the advantage due to the SAKO barrel. Again, this is more to bench rest results than in the field where you have many variables such as your own excitement, perhaps a not so optimal shooting position, wind gusts hitting you, moving target, etc.

I am a little surprised about your choice of the .270 for such a large animal. Have you considered some perhaps more game appropriate cartridges? That is not so say the .270 will not do the job - just that I feel it is a little light for the job at hand.

Best wishes.
Well, a .270 is plenty big for moose. In fact, even a .308 is plenty big for moose. A lot of people underestimate the power of calibres like that on a moose
 

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That is one beautiful gun. It is no doubt the X-Bolt is the sharpest of the 2

Thank you, I would love to take credit for it, but all I had to do was dish out the money. I'm a sucker for Brownings. The optics on it is a Sightron Sii Big Sky 6.5-24x,
 

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Thank you, I would love to take credit for it, but all I had to do was dish out the money. I'm a sucker for Brownings. The optics on it is a Sightron Sii Big Sky 6.5-24x,
Same here, theres just something about a Browning... it seems like whenever I get a new gun it has to be one. I love my 10 gauge BPS
 

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Well, a .270 is plenty big for moose. In fact, even a .308 is plenty big for moose. A lot of people underestimate the power of calibres like that on a moose
Not really in my opinion...after seeing moose run off after being shot by them.
7mm Mag is minimum and most prefer a 300 mag or 338 mag. You need Bullet shock energy for a massive Moose at possible longer ranges. I hunt moose...
270 and 308 are for Sheep , goats , and Caribou or Deer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Not really in my opinion...after seeing moose run off after being shot by them.
7mm Mag is minimum and most prefer a 300 mag or 338 mag. You need Bullet shock energy for a massive Moose at possible longer ranges. I hunt moose...
270 and 308 are for Sheep , goats , and Caribou or Deer.
Well what ranges do you shot them at? The type of hunting I do dont really require shooting out past 100 yards, so I dont want a big big caliber.
 

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Well what ranges do you shot them at? The type of hunting I do dont really require shooting out past 100 yards, so I dont want a big big caliber.
I agree, I don't want my shoulder blown off everytime the trigger is pulled. A .270 will take down any animal in North America. Proper shot placement is the key to a successful kill.
 

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No doubt a couple well placed shots with a 15O grain Nosler partition out of a 270 will kill a moose. But I have also heard of Elk walking away after 3 or 4 shots with the same load. I'd aim for the head or spine if it were me.

As for the two guns you have narrowed down... I asked the same question when looking for a 300 Win mag. I loved the feel of both. I too am a Browning fan and it got the 1+ for looks. But the Tikka got the 1+ for haveing the heavier bolt and a bit better balance for me. Plus the Sako barrel.

The Browning action is just as smooth as the Tikka. The down fall is that it is a very small bolt. It looks like it's built for a 22 not a big centerfire like a 270. The barrel is also very light which means more flex, vibration, and heat warp when taking multiple shots. And there is the inevitable price tag. The Tikka is 2/3's to 1/2 the price of the Browning. That leaves slot of room for better optics and ammo.
 

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No doubt a couple well placed shots with a 15O grain Nosler partition out of a 270 will kill a moose. But I have also heard of Elk walking away after 3 or 4 shots with the same load. I'd aim for the head or spine if it were me.

As for the two guns you have narrowed down... I asked the same question when looking for a 300 Win mag. I loved the feel of both. I too am a Browning fan and it got the 1+ for looks. But the Tikka got the 1+ for haveing the heavier bolt and a bit better balance for me. Plus the Sako barrel.

The Browning action is just as smooth as the Tikka. The down fall is that it is a very small bolt. It looks like it's built for a 22 not a big centerfire like a 270. The barrel is also very light which means more flex, vibration, and heat warp when taking multiple shots. And there is the inevitable price tag. The Tikka is 2/3's to 1/2 the price of the Browning. That leaves slot of room for better optics and ammo.
 
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