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God, Guns, Glory
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Knowing the history, I would say its about time they did this.
 

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First use of the Walker was in the Seminole Wars down in Florida, though. Also the first major sale. And the Colt factory was as Yankee as they came.

Years ago there was a big push to make "Sweet Home Alabama" the official state song of Alabama, and the measure failed because the argument was that Skynyrd was a Florida-based band. Then "Stars Fell on Alabama" was adopted, despite being written by a Californian and originally popularized by a Virginian. When an argument was made in that direction, then governor of Alabama, Don Siegelman, argued that the Jimmy Buffet version was the official version.

The Idea of making a Yankee gun made famous in Florida the official gun of Texas strikes me the same way as "Stars fell on Alabama."

Just as Alabama should have picked the song everyone associates with Alabama (of the two Alabama songs considered, I've only seen women flash their boobs to hear one), so, too should Texas have chosen the Colt Patterson with the 9-inch barrel. Not only was the Patterson officially called the Texas Model in Colt documentation, but was used by the Rangers and various Texas militias alike. It was so beloved in Texas that the next two major Colt revolver models - the Walker and the 1851 - had cylinders marked with famous Texas battles on them.
 

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That's cool. CO is currently turning hard liberal as fast as they can write bills. It's nice to see another state acknowledging firearms like this.
 

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I thought Col. Walker who asked Sam Colt for that revolver design was a Texas Ranger or Texas Militia or something and that is why its called the Walker Colt.
 

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The Walker Colt. I may have to start looking for one of these (replica, probably!). God Bless Texas.
 

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The Walker Colt. I may have to start looking for one of these (replica, probably!). God Bless Texas.
There is one in the 1st comment in this thread...
I'm always happy to enable people to spend money. LOL

 

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I don't know how true it is and I don't have any way to verify it but I remember hearing that until the .44 magnum came about, the Walker colt with it's 60 gr. black powder load was the most powerful repeating handgun. anyone here chronographed their Walkers?
 

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I thought Col. Walker who asked Sam Colt for that revolver design was a Texas Ranger or Texas Militia or something and that is why its called the Walker Colt.
Yup. That is true, but the first shipment and the first use were in Florida. Walker was an Indian fighter in the Creek Campaigns before fighting in the Mexican-American War. He died in 1847.
 

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I'm pretty sure that Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Duvall carried them in "Lonesome Dove".
Mattie Ross carried one that Rooster Cogburn incorrectly identified as "a Colt's Dragoon" in the 1969 version of True Grit. The reason was Henry Hathaway wanted a dramatic contrast between both the Colt Peacemaker carried by all the men in the movie and the gun carried by the much more petite Mattie. The Colt Dragoon is much closer in size to the Peacemaker than the Walker Colt is, so it got the nod.
 
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I don't know how true it is and I don't have any way to verify it but I remember hearing that until the .44 magnum came about, the Walker colt with it's 60 gr. black powder load was the most powerful repeating handgun. anyone here chronographed their Walkers?
The following is copied from the Wikipedia page about the 1847 Colt Walker.

"The Colt Walker was quite powerful, with modern replicas firing modern FFFg black powder producing energy levels in excess of 500 foot-pounds (680 J) muzzle-energy with both picket bullets and 0.454-inch-diameter (11.5 mm), 141-grain (9.1 g) round ball bullets. The black powder Colt Walker is regarded as the most powerful commercially manufactured repeating handgun from 1847 until the introduction of the .357 Magnum in 1935, having a muzzle energy nearly exactly the same as a 4-inch-barreled (10 cm) handgun firing a .357 Magnum.[8] Taking into account its muzzle velocity and energy produced, it currently still holds the record for the most powerful handgun ever issued by the US military. The Colt Walker has long maintained a unique position and mystique among handgun users, and its name is often used as a common expression of any overly large generic handgun example. "


 

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The following is copied from the Wikipedia page about the 1847 Colt Walker.

"The Colt Walker was quite powerful, with modern replicas firing modern FFFg black powder producing energy levels in excess of 500 foot-pounds (680 J) muzzle-energy with both picket bullets and 0.454-inch-diameter (11.5 mm), 141-grain (9.1 g) round ball bullets. The black powder Colt Walker is regarded as the most powerful commercially manufactured repeating handgun from 1847 until the introduction of the .357 Magnum in 1935, having a muzzle energy nearly exactly the same as a 4-inch-barreled (10 cm) handgun firing a .357 Magnum.[8] Taking into account its muzzle velocity and energy produced, it currently still holds the record for the most powerful handgun ever issued by the US military. The Colt Walker has long maintained a unique position and mystique among handgun users, and its name is often used as a common expression of any overly large generic handgun example. "


This claim right here, "The black powder Colt Walker is regarded as the most powerful commercially manufactured repeating handgun from 1847 until the introduction of the .357 Magnum in 1935,..." has always bothered me. I see it everywhere; gun magazines, online articles, forums and entertainment media. If you look up the most powerful handgun of the 19th Century, it comes up. If you look up ballistic charts for the walker, it comes up. You even find this attached to articles about the .357.The problem is that it is B.S.

7.62 Tokarev, literally dozens of the 10-point-something and 11-point-something Euro cartridges, .577 Howdah, 16-bore Howdah, several other Howdah calibers, 9mm Mars, 44-40 (and by extension, 10.8 Belgian) - all of these had similar or better muzzle energy. Two of these calibers were in use around the same time as the Walker, and all the rest came between the Walker and the .357. None of this even takes in the preponderance of idiotic revolvers and multi-barrel pistols firing shotgun shells from the 1870s until NFA 1934. .44 XL and even .410 British (Indian Musket) were not unheard of in revolvers and multi-barrel guns - with the former being very popular here, and the latter being found wherever British people were being served tea by brown people in foreign lands - especially if those foreign lands had people and animals in them not happy about the fact.

You could probably say it was "the most powerful repeating handgun load likely to be found in the Western Hemisphere world until sometime in the 1870s", or "It was the most powerful American-designed handgun load, except for the .44-40, until the first revolver in .357 mag." Propagating some ridiculous lie that no one came up with anything hotter until the 1930s is idiotic. By 1875 half the warlords in the Balkans thought that a Gasser was the MINIMUM you could get away with in a handgun cartridge, and there are all sorts of localized oddball calibers of that era that border on the profane and stupid, and the Iberians and the Belgians were happy to make any stupid thing they could for these guys.

If these claims would stop going by muzzle energy, and instead use terminal ballistics, it would still be wrong, but at least not "as wrong," since we could weed out a lot of the big bores that have a lot of power at the muzzle, but no real range or power at range. That would at least knock most of the Euro cartridges, Howdah rounds, and the shotshells out of the running. People would still have to contend with the existence of 9 Mars, several of the specialized Tok loadings, and even 44-40 within a 50 yard envelope.
 

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I converted my Walker to 45colt and it has been a magnificient pistol
The 45colt is a sizeable step down from a full load with black powder.
You can argue all the technicalities about what was biggest or more powerful...
The truth is the Walker colt still is the the coolest...
And it's handy to have if you have to hunt any blue ducks or correct any surley bartenders...


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