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The government-grown "the Mississippi-grown weed is weak"

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Doglips, May 17, 2002.

  1. Doglips

    Doglips G&G Newbie

    Got this off the AP web site.... Man can the goverment do anything right? I'm just amazed at the stuff we waste $$$ on.

    Researchers: Marijuana Quality Poor
    published 07:46 AM - MAY 15, 2002 Eastern Time


    SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) _ In the world of high-grade marijuana, sticks, seeds and stems are not welcome ingredients.

    Medical marijuana researchers said they found such cannabis chaff among pot from a government farm, and say their patients deserve kinder buds.

    The government-grown marijuana is being provided to San Mateo County for the first publicly funded analysis of HIV patients smoking the drug at home.

    But some of the patients and medical marijuana advocacy groups say the Mississippi-grown weed is weak.

    "It's unconscionable that they would be giving this marijuana to patients," said Dale Gieringer, state coordinator for NORML, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. "It's stale, low-potency ditch weed."

    Fewer than 10 people are taking part in the study originally planned for 60 participants. One man gave up smoking the joints altogether after he became fed up with the low quality.

    The government defended its marijuana, saying it "does not contain sticks and seeds."

    "The problem is re-humidifying. It makes it kind of harsh," said Steve Gust, special assistant to the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

    In Southern California, they're having just the opposite problem.

    Two patients enrolled in a medical marijuana trial program in La Jolla have complained that the NIDA-provided pot is too potent.

    "They've reported getting high shortly after the first few puffs," said Dr. Andrew Mattison, the center's co-director. "These are people with a chronic, debilitating illness who do not want to get high. They want to get pain relief."
     
  2. SPOCAHP ANAR

    SPOCAHP ANAR G&G Enthusiast

    Really

    Leave it to the government to spend more money to make a less superoir product compared to what I can do in my backyard.
     

  3. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    They should take a hint from the State of Florida and out-source to a "private contractor". What doesn't work in Data Processing could work in pot-growing. Heck, any high-school or college kid can do it better. :nod:
     
  4. Good Weed, Bad Weed

    As usual, the dumbasses in Washington can't get their ducks in line. The hemp grown at the University of Mississippi is some of the purest and highest quality in the world. The wild hemp that grows in the State of Mississippi is only about half as potent at the product that is grown at Ole Miss. The dumbasses in washington are smoking the wrong stuff.
     
  5. Oxford

    Oxford G&G Evangelist

    Thank God for medical miracles

    There is a lot of medical value for marijuana and my wife can vouch for that.

    The "weed" was the only thing that kept her from being sick during her chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer. Lots of other legal prescriptions were tried but nothing worked except marijuana "pills".

    Finally a medical university in this state prescribed the stuff for her and the nausousness disappeared. That was a miracle for my wife.

    Oxford
     
  6. BattleRifleG3

    BattleRifleG3 G&G Evangelist

    Pills? Have they finally put it in pill form?
    Sure beats smoking.
    I'm still not a fan of it, but could probably use more education about its medical applications.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2002
  7. Oxford

    Oxford G&G Evangelist

    I'm not sure of the government still allows this practice.

    BattleRifleG3:

    About fifteen years ago the only way the "pills" were available was through a medical school pharmacy. In my wife's case...Kansas University Medical School, upon receiving a prescription from a medical doctor, would issue them.

    I'm not sure if the government still allows this practice.

    There was no doubt, though, that the pills prevented nausousness. Nothing else my wife tried worked so she struggled though chemotherapy with the aid of pills.

    Oxford



    :nod:
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2002