The Model 4595 Is Finally On The Market!

Discussion in 'Pistol Carbines' started by Cyrano, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. Cyrano

    Cyrano Resident Curmudgeon Forum Contributor

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    At long, long last Hi-Point has put the Model 4595 into production. We've only been waiting for it for what, five years now?

    I could wish that they'd been a little quicker with it. After four years of "not yet" and "we don't know when" from Hi-Point, I gave up and laid away a Thompson 'Commando' (the semi-auto-only, longer-barreled version of the M1928 Tommy Gun) at the gun store. I could've bought three 4595s for what that Commando is costing me. Ah well; I suppose I'll just have to law away a 4595 next and then figure out how to build a stock for it that doesn't make it look like an escapee from a science fiction movie.

    Hi-Point Firearms: 4595TS Carbines
     
  2. Man I want one so bad. I have always loved Hi Points and ever since I got my pistol I've been wanting a carbine. When I heard that they were going to make the .45 I knew that it was the I wanted. Now that they are finally here it's time to start saving up. They should be a little easier to find when I'm able to get one.
     

  3. mav359

    mav359 G&G Newbie

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    I saw this a few days ago, I would really like to have one of these, but I do wish someone would make a magazine with a capacity of 20 rds or more.
     
  4. Cyrano

    Cyrano Resident Curmudgeon Forum Contributor

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    Pro Mag makes a 15 round magazine for the Model 995, but so far nothing for the Model 4595. The 4595 is probably too new for the aftermarket companies to be tooled up for accessories and spare magazines yet.
     
  5. DWFan

    DWFan Handgunner Forum Contributor

    Yeah Cyrano, but you can slap a 50 or even 100 round mag on that Thompson and somewhere out there is a guy that makes .400 Cor-Bon barrels for them. How expensive can that combination be to shoot?
     
  6. Uses the same mag as there .45 pistols. Those you can get fairly easy. But as far as large capacity, I don't know.
     
  7. Asked my local gun shop about getting one and he just laughed. Said good luck getting one - everybody wants one.
     
  8. Cyrano

    Cyrano Resident Curmudgeon Forum Contributor

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    Not in NY State, I can't! Not, that is, unless I can find one I can prove was made before September 14, 1994. The evil Patacki Gun Ban restricts magazines to 10 rounds or less regardless of type of gun. Not being entirely without compassion, though, the legislators put in that grandfather clause. Their intent was to keep AK owners and AR owners from using military surplus magazines, since both remained in production. However, it catches people who collect milsurps in the same net. You can, for instance, have a Browning High Power 9mm or a FEG clone with the 15 round magazines they were designed for; but the pre-ban mags cost about a third as much as the pistol per the each, when you can find them. It's why the CZ-82 is popular here. Because it's a C&R pistol and the cops know that, they don't look at the magazines; they hold 12 rounds each.

    But when it comes to carbines and rifles, the authorities DO look at the magazines and it's easy for them to tell if they are pre-ban or not. I haven't heard of anyone being arrested for possession of a post-ban hi-cap magazine - but it could happen. From things I've heard around the range and from cops who are members of my gun club, about all that ever happens (provided the shooter is smart enough to play dumb and say he thought it was a pre-ban mag) is the magazine is confiscated. However, if the LWO wants to make an issue of it, he could arrest the gun owner for possession of an illegal high capacity ammunition feeding device, which is a felony and could cost you your Second Amendment rights if convicted.
     
  9. rondog

    rondog G&G Evangelist

    Well, I used to want one, but I've got so many guns now that I never get to shoot that I've kinda lost the lust.
     
  10. roverboy

    roverboy G&G Enthusiast

    I think its about dang time on the .45. They should have made it first.
     
  11. DWFan

    DWFan Handgunner Forum Contributor

    Cyrano, that just plain...uh...reeks. Did you get the "stick only" model or can yours use the drum mags if you ever get out of the state?
     
  12. Cyrano

    Cyrano Resident Curmudgeon Forum Contributor

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    My understanding is that it would at least accept the 10-round "show" drums Auto-Ordnance/Kahr makes. The original M1928 would accept drums. Dad said once that lots of soldiers who had them were hot to stick a drum onto it - until they tried it and discovered that A) the drums are a pain to load; each cartridge must be put in just so or it will jam on you, and B) loaded 50 round ammo drums aren't light. To an infantryman, any extra ounce you have to hump is the enemy. Dad said he usually had 30 round sticks in his. He felt they were easier to change out under pressure and didn't encourage you to waste ammo spraying the target.

    He also told the story about how, before the war, his basic training platoon was taken to the range to fire the Tommy Gun for familiarization (they were armed with Springfields at the time). Everyone got to fire a couple of sticks. Most of the men in his platoon treated the Thompson like they were in a gangster movie and weren't anywhere near the target because they ripped off long bursts and tried to hold the muzzle down by main force(good luck with that; you have to have arms like Arnold in his prime to make that work). Dad had paid attention and just brushed the trigger; he emptied his magazines in 2 and 3 shot bursts and was hitting in the torso at 100 yards.

    Then a kid from 'way back in the Kaintucky hills got on the firing line. Before he loaded the magazine into the gun, he undid the sling from the buttstock and lengthened as far as it would go. He stepped on the end of the sling that was dangling on the ground and commenced firing 2 and 3 shot bursts, making head hits at 100 yards.

    His drill sergeant asked him where he'd learned how to use the Thompson like that. Turned out his granddaddy had bought a Model 1927 just before the Depression and had put a sling on it; and that was how the family chased the revenooers away from the still when they had a run goin'!

    After basic training, Dad said the kid got orders to whatever passed as Sniper School back then. He was far and away the best shot in the platoon, even better than Dad; and even in his sixties Dad could print a 1 inch group shooting from the kneeling position at 100 yards in a crosswind - I saw him do it.
     
  13. DWFan

    DWFan Handgunner Forum Contributor

    Another knock on the drum mags is that they are noisy as the dickens. You can't sneak up on someone if you're carrying a steel baby rattle filled with marbles. But a Thompson just looks soooooo cool with one.