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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am as many are tired of the rising price of ammunition. I am thinking about re-loading to save $$$ and am wondering if it's worth the time, effore and money. I understand that there is an initial investment, but I want to be sure before I begin that it's good in the long run. I am wanting to re-load .223, 7.62X54r, 380 maybe and not too much else. I am looking for start up costs, where to get supplies and more than anything a cost comparison of a re-loades box to a store bought. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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First, buy a loading manual and read it carefully. This will help you decide what equipment you need. Reloading is easy if you are careful. If you are not careful, or don't like to read and follow directions, don't reload.

Minimum equipment: one of the kits from a loading supplier. Check midwayusa.com for kits.

Get someone who already reloads to help you set up. Preferably pick someone with sense who has not blown up any guns!
 

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How much do you shoot? I go to the range 3-6 times a month and usually use about 100-150 rounds each time, more if I invite someone. I have several 45LC's single action and lever action. It runs about 21.00 dollars plus for a box of 50. I can reload it for about 5.50 for 50. Could do it cheaper if I casted my own lead. Which I will be by next summer. You will get alot of responses here, so this is just my 2cents worth. I bought a lee classic single stage press with a loading manual. $72. Bought a tumbler from midway at $49. Dies $23. Vernier calipers, more reloading manuals for cross reference. If you can't find dealers local, midwayusa is a good place. Powders and primers should be bought locally as to avoid hazmat shipping fees. I enjoy reloading as much as I enjoy range time. Its very addicting. I am sure I left some stuff out, but this is a great site for info. Its where I first came to find info and I have only been reloading about 8 months. Good luck and be safe. Bob
 

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you will hear this again.
i dont save any money but i shoot more.
and i can now justify buying guns in calibers i would have never have bought otherwise!
for instance .454casull , .300winmag. etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I usually go shooting about3 or 4 times a month. I always take my 10/22 which I have no interest in reloading ($9.98 for 550 rds) I also take my AR, sometimes my 380 pistol, and my Mosin Nagant. I would like to be able to put more rds through my AR but $$$$ ammo. It'd be nice to be ablt to take aout 250 rds of .223 and I like to have around 100 of the 7.62X54. It's an expencive hobby.

The best prices I have found between shows and online are between $5-6 per box of 20 of .223, depending on the ammount I get. And for the 7.62X54 I get 20rds for about $1.79. So the whole point is for after start up costs to bring that ammount per box down a bit. I don't mind the time it'll take, but I need to save some bucks. There is a Bass Pro Shops here in Vegas and a few gun stores that should sell powder and primers.

My dad used to reload alot and he would be the one to guide me through the learning process. I loooked at the Lee kits and thought of going with the Lee Loadmaster for the sake of the automation it implies, the other cheaper Lee kits seem like they would take a lot longer to load lots of rounds.

I have been saving the brass from ammo I purchased for all calibers I shoot, so i won't need to buy any.

I am wondering how many rounds I can get per lb of powder for 55gr 223 and the 147gr 7.62X54r.

I hope for many replies from many folks to guid me through the decisions.
 

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I am thinking about re-loading to save $$$ and am wondering if it's worth the time, effore and money.
One thing I am noticing is that the distributors and outlet stores are realizing the rising costs of ammunition and that many are looking at reloading.

They are taking advantage of a new and existing group of enthusiasts and the costs of reloading equipment and components are going up.

In short...they are gonna get they pound of "money flesh" from any new spender and I think the savings in reloading will soon deminish.

I still, and will, reload because of the fun of it...the peacefullness in the shop and knowing I can put out a top quality product for the weapon the ammo is shot in.

That, in itself, is rewarding.
 

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I went with reloading for cost savings shortly after buying my first centerfire rifle. I went Lee all the way(manual, press, dies... approx $100). It nickel and dimed me to start 'cause I needed calipers, powder, bullet puller, bullets, primers, shell holders, case trimming equipment... approx. another $100. But the satisfaction of shooting very tight groups and knowing that I made the ammo myself is great. The more you shoot the quicker you will save money compared to factory ammo. It is also a nice hobby if you have time to reload. It is definately a hobby because it is time consuming and very meticulous work. If you have friends that shoot you might make a few bucks off of them by reloading for them as well, as long as they shoot a caliber you reload for yourself(price of dies have to be considered). You can sell them (your friends) on the concistancy of your rounds and the choice of bullet type. I have been reloading for about 6 months and only shot about 100 rds of mine, it might me 200-300 more rounds before my equipment pays for itself but I love knowing that I created these accurate rounds with my own hands. I've always been a "plinker", now I'm looking at being a hunter as well. With these rounds I should hit any game animal or varmint I want at 300yds easy.
 

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read

roadie: Midway; Southern shooting supply, Brownells, Cabelas.
Read as much as you can. Have several different references. Much "loading" info can be found on the Internet. Manufacturers are posting good data.
Lee Reloading and I just 'blanked' memory.
Goggle search:: ammunition reloading.
Approx. 5 different manufactures for the basic equipment.
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of reloading. It is fun and you can save a few buck$.

There are 7,000 grains to a pound of gunpowder. So, take the # of grains you are going to load in each round and devide it into 7,000, and you have your "rounds per pound". Then devide the price of a pound of powder by the # of rounds per pound, and you have your "powder cost" per round.

I load for the 7.62 X 54R, and get my brass from Graf and Sons. Lapua & Norma make brass for it too, but the cost is much higher.

However, I have some Norma and some Lapua brass I have been loading and shooting for years. I don't know how many times I have loaded them, but it has to be in excess of 20 times for each.

I also have some S&B brass from rounds I bought loaded and fired. It seems to be good brass too.

Keep records of what you load for future referance. If a load shoots tight groups, it's a loading you will want to repeat. Record the results of each trip to the range. I bring each target (marked at the range for cal. and gun) home and measure the groups and record the results. Each rifle will have a prefered load, that gives the best accuracy. I have three 7.62 X 54Rs and each has it's own favorite load.

I highly reccomend the plastic 50 round bullet boxes from Midway USA for storing and carrying your reloads. Also the load lables to stick on each box that tells you the load data for each loading. Their wooden load trays are what I prefer over the plastic ones that come with most kits.

Hook up with your dad, and let him show you the right way to reload. I am teaching my 13 year old son, and he loads almost as good as I do.

Load carefully,be safe and have fun.

Nick
 

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It will cost you more to reload than to buy factory ammo. It is for anyway. It is a little less expensive(depending on round reloaded) than factory, but you will shoot much more. I spend way more on reloading components than I ever did on factory ammo. Reloading, in itself, is another hobby. Look at it that way and go for it, you won't be sorry.
 

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re:reloading

if you reload, you can shoot all day long.... get a reloading manual, study the background info until you understand the basics of reloading and the way powders and bullets and casings work together..... see if you can find someone to help you get started.... start with minimum loads..... be careful, its really important to pay attention to detail.... have fun shooting your own ammo cheaply....
 

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I am wondering how many rounds I can get per lb of powder for 55gr 223 and the 147gr 7.62X54r.UNQUOTE
7000 grains divided by 55= 127.27272727272726
 

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The 55gr-223 / 147gr 7.62 X 54R are bullet weight and caliber #s. Not powder in grains. But you must know that and I misunderstood.

Acording to the Sierra load manuel, a load for the 7.62 X54R with a 150 gr bullet, with IMR 4064, would be between (min) 43.6 and (MAX) 49.1 gr. Using 46 gr as a medium load, you would get 152 rounds per pound.

For the 223 with a 55 gr bullet, using IMR 3031 is, for a med load, (MIN) 21.6 AND (MAX) 24.6, USING 23.6 as a medium load, the rounds per pound = 296.

This will vary from powder to powder and will change as you change bullet weights.

Hope this helps.

Nick
 

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If you shoot a Lot of ammo, then reloading can save you money, especially when you can buy components at gun shows that are less than retail price.
The other major advantage to reloading is being able to fine tune loads for maximum accuracy in your firearms and to create loads with bullets that may not be available as a factory load for hunting everything from varmits to Big Game.
Rich
 

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It's not all that difficult...why it's so easy even a caveman can do it.
There are several starter kits on the market...RCBS, Lee, and I think Dillon; all reasonably priced but shop around. To start, one of the kits will make it easy, has most of what you will need; and as you progress then consider a progressive. A single stroke press is time consuming but gives you experience and confidence.
 

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I usually go shooting about3 or 4 times a month. I always take my 10/22 which I have no interest in reloading ($9.98 for 550 rds) I also take my AR, sometimes my 380 pistol, and my Mosin Nagant. I would like to be able to put more rds through my AR but $$$$ ammo. It'd be nice to be ablt to take aout 250 rds of .223 and I like to have around 100 of the 7.62X54. It's an expencive hobby.

The best prices I have found between shows and online are between $5-6 per box of 20 of .223, depending on the ammount I get. And for the 7.62X54 I get 20rds for about $1.79. So the whole point is for after start up costs to bring that ammount per box down a bit. I don't mind the time it'll take, but I need to save some bucks. There is a Bass Pro Shops here in Vegas and a few gun stores that should sell powder and primers.

My dad used to reload alot and he would be the one to guide me through the learning process. I loooked at the Lee kits and thought of going with the Lee Loadmaster for the sake of the automation it implies, the other cheaper Lee kits seem like they would take a lot longer to load lots of rounds.

I have been saving the brass from ammo I purchased for all calibers I shoot, so i won't need to buy any.

I am wondering how many rounds I can get per lb of powder for 55gr 223 and the 147gr 7.62X54r.

I hope for many replies from many folks to guid me through the decisions.
If i were you i would stay away from a progressive press until you get the hang of it. Slow and steady is the key while learning to reload. a sinlge stage press is your best bet. The LEE classic press is a good one. But id stay away from the kit. all the reviews on the scale say its junk. i bought a Hornady model "M" scale in july and it works great. that, a powder trickler, the lee classic press, lee auto prime with shellholder, lee dies, a manual ( ive had bad expierences with the Lee manual) and a good set of cailpers are really all you need to get started.
 

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i'll agree, progressives arent the best idea for a new reloader. lots of things go on at one time with a progressive. the way i look at reloading is that i can shoot alot more for the same amount of money . in the long run you dont save $$$, you just shoot more- which is a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Most likely I will go with a Lee setup, my Dad said it'd be good to get me up and running. So I guess I got it wrong, a 55gr round is not actually 55gr of powder, so I can get way more than 127 rounds to a pound of powder. Some of you have advised that i not get a multi stage or progresive press kit...why? I know it might be a bit more complicated but don't they save tons of time? A single stage kit I would think takes more steps and more room for error, plus more time. Do the kits come with everything I'd need not including brass, bullets, primers and powder?
 

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less room for error because you will be doing each step at a time.
looking at one case and such.
a progressive is not something i am willing to deal with yet.
i do have a turret press and that saves some time.
 
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