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If I was making the decision I would say take them out of the gene pool.
As noted in this article they sometimes exhibit other physical abnormalities.
Various states differ on their laws though regarding harvesting piebald deer.

 

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they ain't sterile they carry a double recessive gene which gives them their coloring.
they also tend to be easily susceptible to other diseases and ailments because of the gene.
anyway the double recessive is inherited from both parents [the parents only carry a single half of the color anomoly]
 

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information:



Albinism is a recessive genetic trait that is found in animals where the gene responsible for hair, tissue, or skin coloration is missing. Since albinism and piebaldism are recessive traits, both parents must carry the trait to have albino or piebald offspring. The genes responsible for piebald and albino deer are not dominant and oftentimes the deer carrying these genes are biologically inferior.

So if an albino buck were to breed a doe that is not, they could only have an albino offspring if she carried the recessive genes for albinism. These offspring would carry the recessive gene but would have normal pigmentation. When two whitetails breed that carry the recessive genes, they have around a 25% chance of producing an albino fawn. Research says that your chances of seeing an albino in the wild are about one in 30,000, although there are some areas in the north that seem to have higher occurrences of true albino whitetails


Albino deer also often have vision deficiencies. With the handicaps that being a mostly white deer may have, it can be rare for one to reach maturity or even more so, old age. Some states protect albino deer from harvest such as Minnesota, Tennessee, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa. Even piebald deer with more than 50% white hair are protected in Iowa and the same for Montana with more than 75%.There is the rare case where an albino or piebald deer lives to maturity and seems to be in good health without any major deformities. One thing is for sure, they are easy to identify in trail cam pictures among all the other deer that they interact with. If you are blessed to see a piebald or albino deer in the wild count yourself lucky; they are a rare and beautiful sight.
 

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They are protected in Oklahoma. A few years ago we had a state representative so impressed with one he killed he put it on Facebook. Of course somebody turned him in a he looked a fool. It think they are cool and so few they do not really effect the gene pool much anyway. So, I have no issue with just letting them live out their lives and let the few people that see them enjoy that. I have spent a lot of time in the deer woods in several states and never seen one.
 
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