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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok , here it goes. Other than a handful of verbal instructions from mom through a few teachers , I have not had much instructions on what makes good clothing good verses why this is good and that bad . I am not too concerned about appearance here , this is more about this one will save your life and this will have you in hypothermia before you can get a fire started . Functionality, durability, which to get and why . Thanks in advance for any input . Rain gear through mittens and more, let's have it !
 

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I'm tagging or at least going to say I'll say more later today.
You want advice on what to stock up on for later?
Any climate? Or specific?
I gather from rain gear and mittens we're talking Fall Winter and Early Spring?
Home stead? Truck? Or Outdoor living?
General purpose?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mostly concerned with outdoor, cooler to cold , think Arkansas cold not Alaska or northern Minnesota cold . Wet weather and suitable all around weather. I have heard that blue jeans /denim is a fail as far as many were concerned but yet I don't know why . I have worn jeans in many conditions. I don't know what else I am missing. The heavier denim that is treated with a waterproofing aerosol spray , works quite well as far as I was concerned even in a hard rain which I have used at work but usually this is not for extended periods mostly less than a hour. I'm sure that there is probably better gear but not sure what it is. I'm sure that it's probably a get what you pay for as well. I want to be able to be outdoors and be capable of surviving a few days, be it dry, rain , snow. If I need to carry a small pack of clothing so be it .
 

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For cold weather, nothing beats God's designs.
With a little help from mankind, comes wool.
Wool will keep you warm even if it s soaking wet, at 40 below zero.
Then comes leather, fur, hides and skins. Seal skin boots, gloves, pants etc are water proof.
Mankind has survived for thousands of years using these items only.
 

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You know, if I were to recommend just one article of clothing for its universal functionality it would be overalls. All those big pockets front and back and the various, pockets of various configuration on the bib, pockets on the side of the leg, or straps or loops that will hold or suspend stuff there. When you couple all of those gear carrying and concealing possibilities with the fact that they do not require a heavy duty belt tightly around your waist or a set of suspenders in my estimation it's like I just hit an inside the park home run. They are roomy enough to wear thermal long johns underneath and nothing prevents heavy outerwear or raingear being worn over them.
 

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For your outdoor leather boots and shoes keep them conditioned so they maintain their waterproof characteristics. Many suitable products that incorporate mink oil, beeswax, petroleum products, or various other ingredients that if properly used will greatly extend their service life and the wearer's comfort. I currently have a leather conditioner from Red Wing. Other brands are also perfectly fine.
 

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Something that keeps you dry on the outside and lets your sweat make it out of you and into the surroundings. Wet clothes conduct heat over 400x more than dry ones.

Some layer of a decent heat retaining but wicking under that. Wool's OK but not everyone likes how it feels against their skin.

A starting layer of good long johns. Again that won't saturate and get wet.

Also build a fire. Fire is survival TV.
 

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Although Carhartt is in a steady decline (in my opinion) it still makes some very rugged, warm workwear. A pair of insulated bibs and a chore coat will get you through any Arkansas winter. Throw in some wool base layers and wool socks with a good pair of boots, and you may find yourself peeling layers to cool off in even your harshest winter. Whatever you do, don't neglect your headgear. A fur hat of some kind will be most comfortable (important) and throw in a shemagh, and your set. One last thing...get on youtube and learn how to tie your shemagh...it has a thousand uses, and you'll be surprised how many you use.

 

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I like stuff that is good, meaning gets the job done, and doesn't cost enough to replace it ten times with something cheaper.
In no particular order...

Polypropolene thermals, tops and bottoms. Learned about this spelunking. You don't need a lot of heavy bulky cloths on top of these and you can be soaking wet up to your neck and they will act like a sort of, better than nothing meaning cotton, wet suit. I have actually worn these snorkling and diving in uncomfortably "not warm" waters here in Indiana. When you get to a dry section of cave they will be "dry" in ten minutes of walking. Just on a personal note, you don't need 20 sets to last you a life time.

Another tip on leather boots, keep them clean. Especially when using leather treatments. Mink oil and stuff is good but it does hold even just dust. Dirt gets in the crinkles as leather flexes and that is just like sand paper working it to crack and leak. Clean that up frequently and retreat and you will extend the life of expensive leather immensely.

Cotton, the death fabric, in cold weather is a no go. Because it absorbs moisture and stays sticky wet all day and longer out side.

Wool socks, you just can't SAY ENOUGH about a good pair of wool socks and they are getting harder and harder to find and costs more and more. I check the socks sale bin just about every time I go through Rural King, Bass Pro, Cabelas', any of those places like that. Any time of year, especially off season, looking for 50% or more is better wool socks. See my comment on 20 sets of polypro underwear. I have DRAWERS of winter use wool socks and wear them 100% from first of bow season to Easter.

Flannel lined pants, I love those things. I dig them out of the closet the first time I get cold and don't put them away until the wool socks go back.

I been a big believer in buy one good one and you'll be happier than with ten cheap pretenders. I like Carhart but I have to admit I paid up for a pair of Duluth firehose lined pants and those are like walking around in a Cadillac come January. Put them on in a cold morning and I just want to keep wearing those all day, every day, inside and outside. Buy those FIRST and save yourself a lot of money. Buy once, cry once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Although Carhartt is in a steady decline (in my opinion) it still makes some very rugged, warm workwear. A pair of insulated bibs and a chore coat will get you through any Arkansas winter. Throw in some wool base layers and wool socks with a good pair of boots, and you may find yourself peeling layers to cool off in even your harshest winter. Whatever you do, don't neglect your headgear. A fur hat of some kind will be most comfortable (important) and throw in a shemagh, and your set. One last thing...get on youtube and learn how to tie your shemagh...it has a thousand uses, and you'll be surprised how many you use.

Carhart use to be American made . Use to be!
 

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Carhart use to be American made . Use to be!
Not anymore. The old man who built the company passed away and left it to his daughters. They immediately did away with hunting clothing (camo) because they're anti-hunting. They outsourced a number of their clothing lines to neighboring countries. Now, not even a whiff of the company they used to be.
 

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^^^ Up there in post #9 Jack Ryan mentioned Duluth Trading Company. Not too long ago they built a lot of retail stores so that now they aren't strictly mail order for many of us. Their stuff is pretty pricey, but if you sign up for their emails and watch for their sales sometimes you can stumble onto something you need or want for 20% or occasionally even 50% off. Everything I've bought from them so far is really good quality too. I especially like their long tailed pocket tee shirts. My town has a Duluth store but sometimes if they are offering free shipping at a certain price point I just order online and have it shipped.
 

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Dang everything got covered pretty well already.
And yeah we are in the same are generally.
I agree about cotton. Unless it's a hot arid environment; nope not much interest for outdoor wear past a boonie hat.

Boots, I've grown partial to the Avenger brand as sold through XLFEET.com because there they give you the true sizing. I've got two different versions of essentially the same boot.
One is a composite with toe cap safety toe with puncture resistant sole/foot bed.
The other is non safety toe. Think old 70's-80's style hiking/work boots.
But with a waterproof liner.

Socks I agree with wool but I've had good luck with blended polyester and wool that are made here in the USA by Nester Hosiery in N.C. and usually marketed under the RealTree brand.
I've got some that are going on 12 years old that I have not worn out.

Thing about boots, socks, gloves and head wear.
Everyone's circulation differs a bit.
What may work fine for someone else may not work for another.

I've also become a believer in Merino wool socks and I've several pair of thin ones for hot weather; Dickies brand that nearly resemble the old USGI OD boot socks but better made. They also make great liners for extreme cold under my other socks.
Just for reference on boots and socks I'm a professionally measured 14EEEE.
If anyone wonders about socks fitting for reference.

Now here's something to do with circulation, build and natural insulation some may or may not have in relation to base layers. I've got large muscle hairy legs and they don't get cold real easily
As such unless it's really cold just about any polypropylene long johns will do. Between a couple pairs of GI ones I still have and some I got from Wally World
Im good. I did but some slightly thicker ones on closeout that are "Grid Blend" or something or other but didn't try them as they don't flex and stretch as much so holding off until I drop more weight. Which is probably close to the coldest time of winter.
Now on up to the top for base layers same as below.
Must fit right for YOU and not restrict movement.
I've got roughly three different types wait 4 now that I think about it. Thin standard weigh, medium semi woven knit blend, thick knit blend, thick double layer woven and thick knit with thin napped fleece inside.

Next layers speaking of fleece. If they still make the hollow core fiber "Polar Fleece" tops, bottoms gloves, watch caps and face/neck gaiters I'd love to know a source. But decently thick polyester fleece is good stuff period.
All the better in a flat earth brown, tan OD green or charcoal gray, whatever blends in.

Gloves, Gates Brand waterproof and insulated if we are talking cold weather. I also liked their thinner leather palmed camo field and work gloves. Heavy spandex back but I've not seen them in ages
I absolutely hate bad fitting gloves. If it were cold enough to warrant mittens I'd have to have ones with a separate trigger finger.

Head wear for the cold. Fleece neck/face gaiter and either fleece or knit insulated watch cap. I'm in favor of this system over a balaclava simply because here in the south the balaclava maybe too much in less than artic cold. The split top and bottom face covering is more adaptable.
That brings us to outer layers and there's a ton of them to choose from.

As I type this i glance over at the smaller closet and see an old Columbia Widgeon IV Jacket(not the parka) sadly discontinued; AFAIK. I considered it the perfect all purpose outdoor coat at one time. Removable hood and thinsulate liner/jacket. 2 outer cargo pockets that can expand to hold 1 25rd box of 2-3/4" 12ga each and if not elastic shell loops for 4 shells sewn on the inside.
This one is a woodland type camo laminated to Goretex and the outer fabric similar to that of a GI Field Jacket.
It also has two slash fleece lined hand warmer pockets.
Pants/outer layer. Prefer Goretex or other similar breathable fabric. Or the old NY/CO BDU's sprayed down with camp dry but you must be able to hang & air out after wearing either.

One word for those whom are really and I mean you better be really cold natured here in the South or just like to Imagine you're deer hunting in death valley:pRIMALOFT. I bought one brand new but surplus coat in battleship gray and whoa! I can wear a t-shirt under that in +10F to 0F and be okay. In a vehicle it's too much. Cold natured? get the coat and matching over pants and you're good to go.
 

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Layers are your friend. Your base layer for cold, wet weather could be Underarmour under garments (they make a heavier weight for cold use) or Bass Pro/Cabela's brand equivalent. If it's real damn cold, Merino wool is the hands down winner for base layer.
I have both.
 

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^^^ Up there in post #9 Jack Ryan mentioned Duluth Trading Company. Not too long ago they built a lot of retail stores so that now they aren't strictly mail order for many of us. Their stuff is pretty pricey, but if you sign up for their emails and watch for their sales sometimes you can stumble onto something you need or want for 20% or occasionally even 50% off. Everything I've bought from them so far is really good quality too. I especially like their long tailed pocket tee shirts. My town has a Duluth store but sometimes if they are offering free shipping at a certain price point I just order online and have it shipped.
I never pay full retail what THEY are asking. Off season a lot of their best stuff is way marked down and if I don't remember how bad I wanted it 3 months later, I probably never needed it to start with. A few months isn't long to wait for something that is going to last YEARS.
 

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I never pay full retail what THEY are asking. Off season a lot of their best stuff is way marked down and if I don't remember how bad I wanted it 3 months later, I probably never needed it to start with. A few months isn't long to wait for something that is going to last YEARS.

Kinda like when I was buying clothes for work. Winter duds in the spring & summer clothes in the fall, during close outs. :p I've bought shirts for as little as $2-$3! In my work, often ruined the first time I wore them, so didn't have to be the latest fashion or best quality & cheaper the better! 'Course, selection isn't the best, but I'm not all that particular.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Kinda like when I was buying clothes for work. Winter duds in the spring & summer clothes in the fall, during close outs. :p I've bought shirts for as little as $2-$3! In my work, often ruined the first time I wore them, so didn't have to be the latest fashion or best quality & cheaper the better! 'Course, selection isn't the best, but I'm not all that particular.
Most all of my work shirts are tee shirts that are second hand via the salvation army . You go in and ask for a bag of rags , $10.00 , they give you a contractor grade trash bag filled with tee shirts . Some are like new or seldom worn . I have opened the bag and found several in better shape than what I currently had on. They make good wardrobe, rags , bore patches etc. but for the price you are hard to beat the deal as the bags here are at least 50 lbs but I say closer to 80 lb.
 
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