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about 10 years ago I posted the question about this topic. I was in my early 60s and was wondering if it was all worth it (including getting a new rifle) if I only had a few years to hunt. Thankfully I was persuaded that yes, I had enough time left so I got Steve to build me a 7x57 (which I love) and hunted with my son-in-law and my #2 son until prostate cancer surgery stopped me until last year. Now at 74 I start to ask myself the same question, how many years of hunting left? What I determined is that I'll be damned if I'm going to let a few medical issues stop me and I can see hunting until at least 80 although I might let the boys help with the heavy lifting. We used the first round of stimulus money to get a Nordic Track treadmill and I have set a goal of being fit enough to do some decent stalking and walking by the fall. Your mileage may vary. :cool:
 

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I cleaned up my diet a bit this past year, started walking on our treadmill, deciding that I didn’t want to be 235lbs any more. Got down to 200 by hunting season and found I can climb hills much easier with all my gear. I bought a game hoist for my receiver hitch.
I plan on hunting until my 80’s as well.
 

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Had an uncle, hunted, till he passed at 82. They would set him up on portable bench to hunt ground hog, and rabbit in the field. Then deer season his kids built a special stand for him which they would help lift him in and out of. He shot and helped butcher his last deer about 3 months before he died.
 

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You'r luckey. Where I live is mountains and going up hills and down has become almost impossible. After 5 back surgeries I've had to call it quits. We have quite a few folks with Scottish heritage around here. I contacted a cousin in Scotland and told him I question my Scottish heritage with all these mountains. Plus going on 73.
 

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I'm too old to be doing ANYTHING I've been doing today or the last ten years.

I hope they open my funeral with "What the Hell was he out there doing THAT for any way?"
 

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Never stop Bob. When you stop living, you start dying.
Amen, brother. I think the same. I will stop hunting when I can't move any more. I have always preferred to find a good spot and set up an ambush; especially on a hunch. My theory is that animals who don't died scared and running make better tucker. I believe that is true. So, as I have ripened into a senior citizen I have not had to give up tramping up and down mountains (although I did that very thing last fall when the ambushes weren't working). I don't hunt where I have to carry quarters out on my back; gave that up many many years ago. I find places close to old logging roads or trails and preferable uphill from those. I realized it was just not enjoyable to pack out meat and the whole point was to have a good time, not create a miserable, fly-bitten chore. I quit that stuff in my 30's. I don't need the meat to live.

I had an uncle who ran a trap line on foot until he was 83. I'll have to lose some weight to get near that.

When we are dead, we will be dead for a long time. Until then, we should live. Not survive.....live.
 

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My neighbors father is 95 (July 4th I think,) born and raised in Alaska. Every year on his birthday he and his very extended family hike up Flat Top. It is significant enough that the Anchorage Daily News documents it.

I remember two years ago, leaving the Alaska Airmens's Trade Show and getting tired of waiting for the shuttle to the parking area and suggesting we walk. Steve gently reminded me that his Dad was 93.

No idea where I was going with this so......
 

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I used to hunt the mountains. Used to hike miles up and down mountains in W.V. and here in the Appalachian mountains. Now I dont drive to the mountains because of distance. Also most of my friends are gone or have passed. I have resorted to hunting alone for like the past 8 years. I am getting older and dont want to be alone and get lost or hurt and no one knows where I am at. Phones wont work in the places I hunt. I have resorted to hunting public land that is flat and steep hills. I refuse to slow down and let the Buzzards catch up to me. I tell the younger guys that if you slow down and see buzzards circling over you then its time to move faster. If and when I do go I hope its in the woods and not doing nothing.
 

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When I was on the bike with some friends in Craig, CO (Vallarta's Mexican restaurant there is really good by the way) I met an 83 year old gent at breakfast that was grinning from ear to ear and we got to talking. He had tried for 29 years to get a bull elk tag and finally got one. He paid a guide $7,500 - said there was no way that tag was going back unfilled and either he or an elk were going to ride back to Indiana dead. Fortunately he prevailed and bagged an elk the likes of which would make any lifetime hunter proud. Main beams bigger than his arm, just a tremendous animal. Got it with two shots from his .30-06 he had bought when he was 30. I asked him what he was going to do next year and he said "put in for another Colorado elk tag." Man I was so happy for this guy and he was showing pictures to anyone that would look. The Asian lady that owned the hotel told him if he gets another tag the room is on her. Wonderful lady BTW, with a HUGE cat that guards the donuts. Traveler's Inn and Suites and it is 100% set up for the hunter and motorcycle rider if you find yourself in that neck of the woods. Screw Steamboat, go where the real folks are. ;)

Bob, I look forward to seeing pics this year, and next.

When we are dead, we will be dead for a long time. Until then, we should live. Not survive.....live.
BAM! Just like that. I've got no interest in just surviving, I will do my best to survive in order to live.
 

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I once hunted in all the woods in North Georgia with friends. They all dropped out due health issues (four passed away from natural causes).

I am getting older today (on Medicare), and I am thinking of hiring younger folks for help. I can still walk the woods, but I can't get the deer back to camp. I'd offer them $200 per day, and they get to hunt as well. Fair deal or not?
 

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I once hunted in all the woods in North Georgia with friends. They all dropped out due health issues (four passed away from natural causes).

I am getting older today (on Medicare), and I am thinking of hiring younger folks for help. I can still walk the woods, but I can't get the deer back to camp. I'd offer them $200 per day, and they get to hunt as well. Fair deal or not?
More than fair, I'd say. We usually have a handful of younger people on forums up here looking for an older seasoned hunter to take them out and teach them the ropes in exchange for them doing most/all of the chores.
 

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More than fair, I'd say. We usually have a handful of younger people on forums up here looking for an older seasoned hunter to take them out and teach them the ropes in exchange for them doing most/all of the chores.
This is perfect for an older guy. I will arrange the hunting lease and all supplies. I know how the big deer move in certain areas. The young guy will sort out the camp the camp (a cabin) for $200/day.

I will have the option to get him to move them to my hunting space. The game is really smart so all plans can go bad very quickly. It's still nothing better than a weekend in the woods to clear the mind and get back to nature.
 

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yep work within your limitations.
who cares if you get a deer or not, i worked up on a very nice 6x7 bull elk a couple of years ago and just stood there behind a tree at 40yds. watching it tear up the entire mountain side for a good 20 minutes.
never pulled the trigger.
my youngest girl sat on another ridge and watched the whole thing, then chewed my ass out for a good 40 minutes, as we walked back out to the truck.
all i could say was i finally got my chance at a big bull... and,,,,,, i knew the two of us couldn't get it out.
 

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Never stop. Age be damned. Let me die in the woods, in the deepest, steepest, darkest part of the wilderness, with a rifle in my hand and meat on my back. Preferably alone except for God.
Not to be morose, but I share your thoughts.

There have been many hunting trips where the area and the day were perfect. Like the Lakotah Sioux, I said to myself, ‘If it’s here, it’s a good day to die’.

Don’t know if anyone else will understand that sentiment.
 
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