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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got to thinking this morning that I should start tracking target practice by recording results in an Excel spreadsheet. Example attached. A bit of busy work I guess, but seems like it may be helpful to track these results over time and for different rifles/calibers. Any of you bother to track/record your target practice results?

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I got to thinking this morning that I should start tracking target practice by recording results in an Excel spreadsheet. Example attached. A bit of busy work I guess, but seems like it may be helpful to track these results over time and for different rifles/calibers. Any of you bother to track/record your target practice results?

View attachment 143494
Used to save targets with date, ammo, distance, etc. written on them.

Didn’t have the discipline to keep it up. :(
 

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I don't keep track of individual sessions. I figure I am either doing the absolute best I can on any given day or simply throwing some lead downrange without concern for groups.

Before the China Virus I was shooting rifle 3 to 4 times a week. My groups definitely improved after a few weeks of that. Inversely, my steel accuracy has dropped since I stopped competing when the virus shut things down. My slow fire pistol accuracy is as good as it ever was though.

I save targets once in a while, mostly just to put with the loading data when I find a particularly good repeatable load for a rifle.

Let us know if you find tracking to be useful or satisfying for tracking progression.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Been doing it for years, also keep the targets in a notebook
Hi Mouser -- Since you keep them, do you use them for any follow-up purpose? For example, I'm thinking they will help indicate better accuracy with more practice, that's the obvious one. But some other thoughts are they may better clarify which cartridges/loads do better at different distances, as well as perhaps provide an early indicator of when a barrel is burning out.
 

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I use them to keep track of which loads are most accurate and so that if I can't get the ingredients to load that load I have a list of what will do until I can. I only shoot center fire rifles at 100 yards from the bench when doing accuracy testing. I've not done enough shooting with any one rifle to have burned a barrel out, and if I can't get a rifle to shoot, it doesn't last long around here.
 

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I do like mouser does. I keep notes on what groups well and shoots well.
I'm going to start a spread sheet for velocities that I can add my notes to.

And my reloading notes are keep better then my shooting notes
 
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I keep a long range log on all my rifles with atmospheric conditions and any changes that I must make on my dope for the ranges that I'm shooting that day.
I also keep separate load data notebooks with targets on each rifle with each bullet / powder combination. I also keep notes on the conditions as well as chronograph #'s for each load.
Depending on the temperature,I may have 2 or 3 loads that I need to shoot at different times of the year to keep from having high pressure problems with different powder's.
 
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