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True Lawyers story

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by SPOCAHP ANAR, May 2, 2002.

  1. SPOCAHP ANAR

    SPOCAHP ANAR G&G Enthusiast

    A woman who worked at a law firm was sentenced to prison for embezzling money from the firm. From what I gather from the news is the woman became first acquainted with the firm when they represented her for an earlier crime in which she recieved 6 months probation.

    The lady had worked for Nation's Bank and yes the charge was embezzlement.

    Some people just do not learn; the lady or the Law firm!
     
  2. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    Heck, most of the Tallahassee City Commission members have been convicted of various crimes. One of them even used his wheelchair-bound young son to commit shop lifting. These same staunch city fathers and mothers still get re-elected time after time. It's a case of the foxes guarding the henhouse. And that ain't no joke!
     

  3. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    Here's another True Lawyer Story, from the Urban Legends website:

    Claim: A lawyer demonstrating the safety of windows in a skyscraper crashed through a pane and plunged to his death.
    Status: True.
    Origins: On 9 July 1993, Garry Hoy,
    a 38-year-old lawyer with the Toronto law firm of Holden Day Wilson, did indeed plunge to his death from the 24th floor Toronto Dominion Bank Tower in front of several horrified witnesses.
    The firm's spokesperson said Hoy ". . . was testing the strength of the window. There was a lot of joking about how the window wouldn't open maybe on a hot day . . . Apparently, it was the second attempt [at testing the window] that one of them popped out and he went through."
    As well, a Toronto police officer reported that Hoy ". . . was showing his knowledge of the tensile strength of window glass and presumably the glass gave way. I know the frame and the blinds are still there."
    Our advice is to apply the same rule to architecture as you do to computers: Don't ever bet your life on windows not crashing.