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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, Following on from the last post, I also have a 1872 2 Band Tower musket. This one does have the stamps between the hammer and trigger, but other 1872 Tower muskets I have seen have the Crown stamp behind the hammer mechanism while this one is in front. Therefore, I am trying to find out if this unmodified musket is some how different to other tower muskets from around the same period.
There are stamps on the left side of the barrel which are shown in the photographs. These stamps appear to be the number 25 followed by a symbol I cannot clearly see, then what looks like the head of a trident pointing backwards, then a symbol of an arrow pointing backward and a symbol of a line (possibly with some cross marks, leading to a offset square. In front and below of the number 25 and almost covered by the stock are symbols that are either 3 -4 x the letter A with small inverted arrows separating them, or 3 - 4 larger arrows pointing down with smaller arrows pointing up and separating them. This is shown on the last photo.
Any help to confirm what this musket is or may have been issued too will be much appreciated.
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Your gun is a Pattern 1856 Sergeant's Fusil for India Service. Unlike the other rifles in the P1853 family of arms like the P1856, P1856 No. 2, P1858, P1860, and P1861, the Sergeant's Fusil was built to accept a socket bayonet rather than a saber bayonet. They can be distinguished from shortened P1853 rifle-muskets by the position of the rear sight, which is closer to the rear barrel band than what is seen on a rifle-musket, and the stud mounted rear sling swivel located on the belly of the buttstock.

This rifle looks to me to be a native copy built with mostly British parts. The date on the lock appears to have been added some time after the lock was built; quite possibly when this gun was put together. The lock itself is not a P1856 lock. It looks to be from a P1842 or perhaps a P1839.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much for your detailed information. I do not know if it came from Afghanistan or not. I brought both rifles at an auction 30 years ago in Brisbane Australia. I was going to build a display at home, but life got in the way and they have sat in a cupboard since then. I am thinking about selling them, but really did not know what they were and did not want to misrepresent them. The barrel is smooth bore and I suppose this would make sense if it was used in colonies.
 

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Your gun is a Pattern 1856 Sergeant's Fusil for India Service. Unlike the other rifles in the P1853 family of arms like the P1856, P1856 No. 2, P1858, P1860, and P1861, the Sergeant's Fusil was built to accept a socket bayonet rather than a saber bayonet. They can be distinguished from shortened P1853 rifle-muskets by the position of the rear sight, which is closer to the rear barrel band than what is seen on a rifle-musket, and the stud mounted rear sling swivel located on the belly of the buttstock.

This rifle looks to me to be a native copy built with mostly British parts. The date on the lock appears to have been added some time after the lock was built; quite possibly when this gun was put together. The lock itself is not a P1856 lock. It looks to be from a P1842 or perhaps a P1839.
Even though I know better, this place never ceases to amaze me.
 
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