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Discussion Starter #1
I've been collecting MI battle rifles for a number of years. Whenever I take them out from my safe to admire their magnificence and would try to imagine the man who had carried it. Also in the dusty far corner of the safe, behind these graceful war relics stood a short but deadly rifle which was also a weapon of a long ago war, the sister to these historical MI Garand's. It was given to my Dad in the late 50's, as a gift from a old collector who lived in our quiet little lake shore Northern Michigan tow, for all the kindnesses my father would showered upon the man and his wife. They have now all moved on, but the rifle although taking up a cubby at the back of my safe, still brings back fond memories of the years my Dad would climb the hills and valleys of our tiny county chasing the elusive white tailed deer that populated our forests.
While meeting a collector in Arizona a number of years ago who had a number of these rifles, I casually mentioned I too had a carbine with an odd serial number. He took the hook and asked me the question that I've since learned every collector of these famous battle asks, " does it have an X". I replied, "why yes, how did you know"? It has an X directly proceeded by 2487. His eyes lit up. A few days later he sent me an email with a three sentence paragraph relating to the mysterious X carbines included in Craig Riesch's collectors book titled "U.S M1 Carbines, Wartime Production". Once I returned home to Michigan and after spending a snowless winter there, I bought the paperbacked book and pulled out Dad's old rifle once again and began taking it apart to examine the various pieces that made up it's configuration as a rifle. The bore was like new. However, the manufacturer IBM and the original multiple serial number was not legible though the nicely factory green reparkerizing that had been done probably at the end of WWII. The stock was made by "Standard Products" with various sized crossed cannon cartouche's stamped into the wood along with "Stand. Prod. included at different locations on the stock. The trigger group was stamped IO and the safety, rear sight and added bayonet lug were the updated types shown throughout his book.
Anyway, I assume the X serial number was placed on the rifle due to the unreadable original serial number as the rifle had no other signs of any special wood or metal work.
I saw this site and found it quit interesting, noticing that several of the members knew a great deal about these magnificently engineered rifles created by a man named "Carbine Williams" who had been incarcerated for having killed a revenue officer while raiding his still. For his efforts (I believe), he was pardoned for creating the very weapon that had put him in prison in the first place.
An old black and white movie played by Jimmy Stewart who would place him forever in histories "Hall of Fame".
I was hoping someone along the way could confirm my conclusion, or send me along a different path.
 

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Sometimes an X following the serial number indicates the serial number has a duplicate, with the X being used to identify one from another.
Some X marked serial numbers are for presentation M1 Carbines. Does the rifle have any other markings or was it presented to you or the previous owner?

X series serial numbers as I was told.
X1 to X100
XA1 to XA100
XB1 to XB100
XC1 to XC100
XD1 to XD100
XE1 to XE100
XF1 to XF100
XG1 to XG100

Usually if it is a presentation rifle the X will be before the serial number.
If it is a duplicate serial number the X will be after it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sometimes an X following the serial number indicates the serial number has a duplicate, with the X being used to identify one from another.
Some X marked serial numbers are for presentation M1 Carbines. Does the rifle have any other markings or was it presented to you or the previous owner?

X series serial numbers as I was told.
X1 to X100
XA1 to XA100
XB1 to XB100
XC1 to XC100
XD1 to XD100
XE1 to XE100
XF1 to XF100
XG1 to XG100

Usually if it is a presentation rifle the X will be before the serial number.
If it is a duplicate serial number the X will be after it.
I was a young boy when he got it. The serial number reads X2487 on the top of the receiver.There are no other marks that I'm aware of. Being a Garand collector, I'm moving into uncharted territory. The stock other than the crossed canon and stand.prod. stampings into the stock, have seen no other unusual markings on the stock or barreled receiver and it's components.
 

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Any way you could post some pics of it?
 

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I don't think I have ever seen one nice enough to still have the crossed cannons impressed into the stock.
upload_2018-4-12_9-28-7.jpeg


the crossed cannons was a mark used by Springfield at their armory, it was also used by some units of the navy and army.
 
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Ordnance Department Acceptance Marks (cartouche)
Things you should know:
  • Not all stocks were marked with an inspection mark and crossed cannons


  • Some stocks were marked with the crossed cannons only


  • Sometimes the cartouche has worn off over time and use


  • Many inspection marks and/or crossed cannons were stamped at a slight angle causing a deeper imprint on one side than the other


  • The inspection mark and crossed cannon designs are specific to the prime contractor who assembled the carbine


  • The height, width, and positioning of the inspection mark and crossed cannons in relation to one another were also specific to the manufacturer


  • Replica metal stamps with which to forge or duplicate the cartouches are sold by a number of retailers
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I had to remove the rear site in order for you to see the IBM stamp & the rifles original serial number.
 

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It does look like your Carbine's unusual serial number is from the unreadable original serial number and not from a presentation model. Probably when the rifle was last rebuilt it got that number. Very nice rifle though.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for your help. I've never actually seen a presentation carbine to compare mine to, so I had nothing to base a conclusion from other than my gut and years with the M1 Garands.
I never realize there were so many variations of this rifle built. I can see now why guys collect them.
 

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"The inspection mark and crossed cannon designs are specific to the prime contractor who assembled the carbine"

Mostly true. Some contractors made stocks as replacement parts and they were not put on assembled carbines. They were used as replacements for damaged stocks. These will have the ordnance stamp for that particular contractor.

I notice too that the slide is an Underwood. The small ordnance bomb by the slide handle tells me that.
 
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