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Jennifer Carter: Ma'am; I know nothing.

For another reference

https://www.gunsinternational.com/g...e-with-original-bayonet-.cfm?gun_id=101246153

Smith Corona Model 1903A3 Rifle with original bayonet.

Description:
Serial #3676426, 30-06, 24" 4-43 dated Smith Corona barrel with a bright excellent bore. The metal surfaces retain 95% quality dark gray original Smith Corona parkerizing with some very light edge wear and minor oxidation staining in the corners of the bottom metal. The bolt body and its component parts are blued with only minor operational wear and is marked with only an "R" atop its root, next to a punch mark which is also found underneath, and has a square safety lug. The straight grip dual recoil pin walnut stock and handguard rate near excellent. Slightly lightened boxed FJA inspectors mark, Raritan Arsenal "RA-P" mark below an off-struck ordnance wheel and circled P firing proof. There are only a few minor light scratches and handling marks. Included is an S stamped sheet metal front sight protector and a green1 1/4" military sling. A very fine Smith Corona rifle which likely had the bolt replaced at the arsenal.

This Smith Corona comes with an original U.S. Military 1942 dated sling that is in excellent condition.

Excellent example of an all-original World War 2 1903A3 rifle made by the Smith Corona company in 1943. The Smith Corona made '03A3's are much more scarce than the Remington produced rifles, with Smith Corona making a total of 234,580 rifles versus Remington's total production of 707,629 rifles. The correct mixture of blued and parkerized finishes on the various parts of the rifle are all very attractive with nearly zero wear or finish loss. The bolt has really nice original blue finish with little wear and a perfect bolt face. The stock bands and rear sight show nice original blue finish as well. The parkerized receiver, barrel, bayonet lug, and triggerguard / floorplate assembly all show a very attractive original dark green/gray color typical of a wartime finish. The bore in this 1903A3 is perfect. The rifling still has nice sharp lands and grooves and there is no pitting or erosion visible. The original stock on this Smith Corona is excellent. The original steel buttplate is still intact on this rifle, and the butt trap door is in excellent working condition. All of the controls and functions on this '03A3 are in perfect working order including the adjustable rear sight. The action is nice and smooth but still precise, locking into battery perfectly. This Smith Corona 1903A3 with sling would make an excellent addition to any U.S. Military weapons collection or any gun collection for that matter. Military rifles in this condition have proven to be excellent investments, and becoming very hard to find.

Price: $1,995.00

Curio/Relic: Yes
Manufacturer: Smith-Corona
Model: 1903A3
Serial Number: 3676426
Caliber: 30.06
Bore: 2
Chambers: 98%
Ejectors: 98%
Condition: 95%
Metal Condition: 95%
Wood Condition: 95%
Bore Condition: 1
Barrels: 98$
Action: Bolt
Stock Dimensions:
Original
 

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Welcome from the Texas Panhandle, Ma'am.
 

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It’s hard to evaluate it on the high end without knowing what it gauges. If the bore is good, $800 to $900 based on the photos and description. Possibly more with a better description.

It’s a nice looking example from what I can see though.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I would have to agree with the numbers posted here ($1200 or so). Your rifle appears to be in excellent, perhaps un-issued condition. If the bore is bright and shiny all the better. The paperwork shown in your post looks like the paperwork that came with the 03-A3's my Dad purchased from the DCM (Director of Civilian Marksmanship) around 1962 +/-. The cost of those rifles to civilians then was $17.00 delivered... No typo there. That was a time when some people in our government thought marksmanship skills were a good thing for the citizens to know. So sad that appears to be changing. Make sure you keep the bore clean and lubed. Remove the bolt and bore cleaning is to be done from the breech end in case you didn't know. If you don't know how to remove the bolt, ASK. It is very easy. The "Springfield Rifle" as they are known was the first centerfire rifle I fired at the Lyman range (Blue Trail) in Wallingford, Ct in the summer of 1963, I was 9 yrs. old. They are kind of special to me. Nice rifle you have there...
I did remove the dang bolt and cleaned it. Now, I can not get the stupid thing back in. Guess while I was rubbing it down I got the on/off switch press the wrong way and it will not come back up. When I try to put it back it the switch get stopped by the stock. I read somewhere what to do, but they wanna use fancy gun names that I'm not familiar with. I need you press the trigger while pushing the blank button. Lol! I need that crap simplified.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Hi Jennifer and welcome to Gun & Game. I still live in Maryland near the Chesapeake bay. That Smith/ Corona is very nice condition it looks. With the condition and papers and if bore is good I would say like it may fetch towards $1200.
My mom lives on Chesapeake Beach on the Bay with a great view. I'm not that fond of northern beaches. I'm stuck on my Gulf Coast beaches. Absolutely breathtaking!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I would have to agree with the numbers posted here ($1200 or so). Your rifle appears to be in excellent, perhaps un-issued condition. If the bore is bright and shiny all the better. The paperwork shown in your post looks like the paperwork that came with the 03-A3's my Dad purchased from the DCM (Director of Civilian Marksmanship) around 1962 +/-. The cost of those rifles to civilians then was $17.00 delivered... No typo there. That was a time when some people in our government thought marksmanship skills were a good thing for the citizens to know. So sad that appears to be changing. Make sure you keep the bore clean and lubed. Remove the bolt and bore cleaning is to be done from the breech end in case you didn't know. If you don't know how to remove the bolt, ASK. It is very easy. The "Springfield Rifle" as they are known was the first centerfire rifle I fired at the Lyman range (Blue Trail) in Wallingford, Ct in the summer of 1963, I was 9 yrs. old. They are kind of special to me. Nice rifle you have there...
Yes, he was a NFA member and My step father was the head of Anniston Army Depot which is where these came from. The price you stated was correct. Love it how older people kept everything. My granny was the best book keeper. She has everything priced like it is a dang store. Then, if it came from a catalog well it is archived in the shopping addiction book of fame.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
The last time I saw a Springfield at the gun shop in NRA Surplus Excellent at the gun shop, it was going for $1200 with no papers. It's a World War II production gun, if memory serves.
This Springfield part confuses me. How does one know if it is that. Didn't they take over the contract or something?
 

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This Springfield part confuses me. How does one know if it is that. Didn't they take over the contract or something?
The Springfield Armory during their existence utilized numerous civilian contractors to fulfill their production needs. Smith Corona of typewriter fame was just one of many of those civilian contractors. This WIKI article hits some of the high spots of that history...
*****
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springfield_Armory
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The Springfield Armory during their existence utilized numerous civilian contractors to fulfill their production needs. Smith Corona of typewriter fame was just one of many of those civilian contractors. This WIKI article hits some of the high spots of that history...
*****
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springfield_Armory
Thanks for the link. Yeah, I have one of their typewriters also. Its brand new and probably as old as me lol!
 

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I also agree with Bigfoot's estimate. When the more common 03A3's pop up on the local gun Grapevine I'd expect to pick it up for $400 - $550 but if I walked away with that one for around $800 or so I'd consider myself lucky. Like Griz commented, I hate plastic and I'm digging the looks of that cabinet and I love the look of purdy' wood and steel rather than the run-of-the-mill plastic wrapped guns you see these days
 
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Several years ago at a gun show I bought a few 03A3 Receivers I think from James River Armory. They used to be near where I live but moved south. I paid $125 for each receiver with bolt in like new condition. I built hunting rifles on those receivers already. They are probably the the hardest ever heat treated receiver. Ever try and drill and tap one for a scope? Good luck. You have to use an oxy/acetylene torch with tiny tip to spot anneal before you even think about drilling.. Those receivers have dried up and cant find them now
 

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Discussion Starter #35
It does have a arsenal stamp, but seems it must have just been through one and not actually rebuilt. My gun friend said it was put there before they were sold to the public.
 

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Although this is an older thread, there is some misinformation here.....

Arsenal stamps were not applied prior to public sale. They were applied at overhaul/rebuild at various arsenals. Not to be confused with inspector's initial stamps that were applied at manufacture.

There were only 2 contractors manufacturing 1903/1903a3/a4 rifles. Remington and SC. Not numerous civilian contractors. The other 2 manufacturers were Springfield and Rock Island which were govt arsenals.
 
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