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Hi everyone, New to this forum, I am interested in taking on duck hunting and I am currently looking to buy a shotgun. Can anyone give me some tips on which gun is optimal for this sport, and of best quality? thank you.

By the way, Have any of you heard of Tannerite Exploding Targets? I use them for practice shooting with my 3030, If you havent tried these awsome targets check them out.

Heres the link
www.tannerite.com

And check out this site too if you want some awsome stuff for the 4th of july. I use these to get rid of moles, Havent found anything better

www.survivalops.com

Nice to meet you all.
 

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Welcome to Gunandgame! I hope you'll visit here often and share in all our discussions, which can cover just about anything (and I mean anything).

As far as duck hunting shotguns, a lot depends on your own tastes, but I've always been a fan of pump actions, particularly the Mossberg 500. The Remington 870 is a fine gun too. The Maverick 88 is an economy version of the Mossberg 500 that is identical except for having a trigger safety instead of a thumb safety.

Expect to pay $160 for a Maverick, $200 for a Mossberg 500, and $250 or more for a Remington 870.

Or see what's available used. Also make sure you get the right barrel/choke combination, which I can't help with.

If you want to use 3.5" loads, the Mossberg 835 is there, and versions of the Rem 870 as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mossberg 500

Thanks for your warm welcome battlerifleg3

I had a couple of friends tell me that I should go pump, And even more tell me to get the mossberg 500, I guess it's a matter of opinion...Man, I wish I could try em all out. lol
 

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Since 03-15- 2002
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ALRIGHT!

A new person hooked on QUACK!

The kind of gun you get depends on several factors.

How will you hunt? Open water, timber, fields, etc.

Steel shot is the most common shot. Other non-toxic fodder is available (at typically high cost) but steel works. How does this relate to the shotgun. You will need a fairly modern gun, past 15~ 20 years or a very high quality older gun for the barrel to be able to resist the hardness of the steel pellets. Shot wads have come a long way, byt steel does not "flow" like lead. It tends to cram through the choke in a wad of shot. My dad's Browning auto 5 circa 1969 has digested thousands of rounds of steel with no ill effect.

The secret to steel ids larger pellet size and SPEED. The lighter steel looses energy quickly. Pick up a box of steel and usually there is a shot size recomendation on the back of the box. I like 2's for ducks, I used to use 4's in lead shot. Keep the speed up to around 1400 ~ 1500 FPS. Standard loads are 1350. They don't cut it AS WELL. To get speed, and a decent payload minimum 1 1/8 oz. You would be served well with a gun that is 3" capable 3.5" is handy on geese. Practice with the gun you duck hunt with.

You need to choose from a pump or semi-auto. Pumps are less expensive. Auto's are good for quick follow up shots. I don't care how good you are with a pump. Get turned sideways, twisted up shooting at a mallard doing 75 over your head and the grace sometimes goes out the window. BTW never take an unsafe shot. Always know your surroundings with your hunting buddies and neighbors.

Pick up a lot of guns and feel which one is right for you. Swing, and balance are important. I like 28"+ barrels on duck/goose guns. Your probably not going to be carrying it in the field much. A longer sight plane is nice. I also find some shorter bbl lighter guns swing too fast for me. Personal preference all the way though.

Patten your gun. It dosen't have to be real scientific. You'd be suprised at the number of people who do not do this. draw a 30" circle on paper, pace off 30 ~40 yards and make sure your point of aim is centered and pellet dispertion is fairly even. Steel shot shoots tighter in most chokes compared to lead. try different chokes. Again, go to the trap range. Shoot, shoot, shoot.

Synthetic or wood? I like the look and feel of wood. Some guys claim synthetic being lighter transmits more felt recoil too. Cammo or black syn. It dosen't really matter as long as it's not shiny. Ducks pick up movement and shiny things.

Sling. depending on how your hunting you may want the capability to install a sling for the gun.

Price. Get the gun you want. if it's 200 or 900 dollars. The other acceaories you will buy will make the gun price look like childs play. unless you have a buddy who will let you tag along with his dog, boat, decoys, borrowed waders, clothes, heater. etc. etc..

If you have the opportunity, shoot some of your friends guns. Whatever you get, practice and make safety 2nd nature. We duck hunters do things that would make Mr. safety cringe, but it's part of the territory. Loading guns in blinds with more than one person. Shooting at cripple ducks on the water, shooting from a boat, establishing shooting zones in blinds so no one gets thier head blown off, all that fun stuff. Suprisingly the sport is pretty accident free. Mostly drownigs and hypothermia. Oh, find out where other duck hunters buy thier guns. The help will more than likely be more custom tailored there.

Foregot to mention doubles and over/unders. I don't normally consider them because tha are very hard to load in a pit, somewhat cumbersome in a blind. 2 shots are normally all you get though.

Now, let's get a shotgun and go hunting.

Welcome,
Jerry
 

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Hi Gossettc68,

Having duck hunted over the last 28yrs. and guided for some of them I can whole heartedly agree a pump is the way to go. Very Very reliable, tough to jam, unless short stroking. Handles different loads with ease.

Now having said that, what do I shoot. An automatic A-5 Browning. Why? Well got it cheap and I like the shell stop selector. I can not tell you how many times out hunting the sitituation changed and I wanted to change loads without emptying the gun and reloading. And recently I started using a Browning BPS 10ga. It's a pump, 28" barrel with interchangable chokes. Most people don't like the 10 with the 3 1/2" 12's about, but I sure like it when it comes down to reaching out and touching something. As a guide you shoot last on clean up for your customers and the 10 does a real neat job of it.

BRG3 is right on those pump gun prices but I will add this for thought. The Rem. 870 Express is for that price. The problem is the finish on the Express model will rust as you watch it in a harsh environment, like rain. The 870 Wingmaster is a better buy in my opinion. Same gun, blue finish that wears better. Though a good wipe down after a day in the field is always recommended.

Now on to nostalgae (sp). If you have the pockets a good side by side or over and under has it's romantic charm. But more than that there is less moving parts to break or jam and bad weather doesn't effect them as much. And there's always the safety factor. When in tight in a blind with people you may have never have met before an accident can happen. I have yet to see an accidental discharge with a two barrel broke open.

Also consider a chambering of 3"-3 1/2". In the old days with lead 2 3/4" was adequate. I'm not saying you can't do it with the smaller shell, but why handicap yer self.

Just my two cent.

And welcome again and be safe afield. As I always say don't shoot my dekes and don't shoot my dog, both will get you killed. Smile.
 

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Since 03-15- 2002
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True on the 870. Iv'e hunted with a Wingmaster for 22 years. Other than a ding or two the gun is in excellent shape
 

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Geez Jerry, you think we gave him too much information too fast. Grin. See, look there, his heads just a spinning.
 

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Welcome to G&G Gosset -- hope to see you posting regularly you may want to refer to the following link for personality types ---http://www.gunandgame.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=19304

Not being a duck hunter yet but an avid gun slut (yes I admit it ) I would go with BRG's recommendation of the Mossy 500 Pump gun its a very stable starter shotgun. for the more advanced purchases you can't beat a good used Rem 1100 SA-- either way we hope to hear about your harvests
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ack! My head is spinning!

lol, That is alot of information. but all of it is most appriciated :)
Let me go over it again and see if I can comprehend it all :p

Thanks for your imput guys.
 

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Welcom to G&G. If you are interestd in semi-auto Checkout Mossberg's new semi-auto.
 

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welcome aboard!

:cool: Great question. I can't add anything but my endorsement to the above answers and suggestions. I'm partial to the 870 magnum. I own one and just love the smooth and balanced gun. I have a lusting for the 3.5 inch version but, money is hard to come by. I like the idea of an auto loader but have been put off by the delicate O-ring mechanisums {sp.?} but, they don't seem to be much of a problem except in very, very cold/freezing weather. Being a mechanic, I look at stuff like this. But, I often find I'm not as smart as I think I am. So, I welcome you and hope you will visit and argue with us as often as time and interest permit! As mentioned above, we talk about almost any subject.:D
 

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I doubt I'd buy an auto 3.5", as the range it would have to cycle would be too high. Except perhaps the Baikal MP153 for $320 that is supposedly self regulating.
 

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Duck hunting is probably one of the roughest hunting sports on equipment. You are always wet and usually cold. I have hunted ducks just about everyway imaginable from back bays, swamps, rivers, ponds, and large lakes. All of the conditions are brutal on a shotgun. Jerry is right about all of the different ways to go about picking a good shootgun. Here is my input. I am very partial to my 870 Express 3inch mag. I have upgraded it though. I have put Hogue forend and buttstock on it for a comfortable, no slip when wet grip. Get a glow sight for it also, this really helps pick up the birds. You can get ones that can screw into the rib or ones that slide on without any mounting hardware. My 870 is parkerized and it does wear off and it does rust if you do not oil down when you get out of the field. You can have it dipped to protect it, but that costs more money. That is my only complaint on the 870. I have come back from week long trips and the thing is a giant mud ball, but never missed a beat. There are other good shootguns out there also. I would stick to pumps. They hold up well with few moving parts. It is not a good experience standing waist deep in water and having to disassemble an autoloader only to drop an O-ring in the water. It ruins the hunt. I have hunted with O/U also. They are close to useless when standing in the water. It is very unnatural trying to break it open over your head and loading. In a blind your movement is restricted and you bump into things while breaking it open. The recoil is heavier because there is no action to relieve the recoil. All of the gas goes out the barrel. Plus I have trouble tearing up a $1000+ gun. They are hard to beat for doves or upland birds There are more pros than cons on using a pump while duck hunting so I would stick to pump actions. Honestly, I would get a pump that shoots 3 1/2" mags. You might never have to use them, but it is there if you need it. I am planning on goose hunting for the first time this year and would like to use 3 1/2". As far as shells, I would stick to steels for price and availibility. If you are hunting over decoys in a close shooting are #4's will do the trick. I hunt the 1st half of the season with 3" #4's and the second half with 3" #2 because the birds are more wary. If you have any more questions about ducks, please post. Duck hunting is not a passion, it's an obsession.
 

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Man, I'm ready to melt lead weights and tie up some blocks :D

BRG, I'm not understanding the "cycle" thing. There are a lot of very good 3.5 auto's out there. Look at the Benelli super black eagle Semi-Auto's in general all don't have the "O" ring. I know my dad's 11-87 did. The new Mossberg 935 does not. Matter of fact is is not self regulating, which restrics it to use with 3" & 3.5" shells. I did read an article where a guy broke it in after 100 rounds and was able to shoot heavy 2 3/4" loads.

I'm still looking at the Mossberg, but thinking about changing jobs, better cool my heels a bit.
 

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I bought a half dozen wigeon decoys by Greenhead, an Avery product, man talk about awesome detail and not too pricey either. They look and ride better in the water than Flambeau.
 

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I only meant that you generally have to design a shotgun to operate with a certain load, and if you use too wide a range of loads it eiter won't cycle or will wear itself out. My staple loads are 2.75" shot and slugs, so I would never want a shotgun that sacrificed reliability with those rounds in order to use 3.5".

I would get a pump if I wanted a 3.5".
 

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I sort of agree and disagree. There are alot of shotguns out there (semi's) designed to function in a wide range. granted the 935 is designed around the 3 & 3.5" they tell the customer this up front. It's designed as a waterfowling working gun.

Again, if you want to look at some awesome engineering look at the Benelli system. It handles a wide range and won't "wear" itself out.

BRG3, your a bright young man and very knowledgeable about guns, but your going to have to dig a lot of mud out of your butt crack before understanding how hunting guns work in the real world.
 
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