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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last weekend I went MIA, and what a place to go


Four of us tramped into a big valley called Karangarua river, took us 5.5 hours to get to the hut on top of a six hour drive.


Once we got in there it started to rain :( but we still got out here and there.
The boy's got a couple of Chamios about 300 yrads from the hut


About 15 minutes after I took this photo a yearling walked out onto the far side.


The view from the hut



And finally one of the boy's having a look about
 

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What an amazing part of the world. If I ever came to NZ, you can bet I wouldn`t be too concerned with seeing bubbling mud.. I`d wanna hit the mountains : tahr, deer etc...
 

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I dont know if any one realises this from burma and new guinea in ww2 new zealand has one of the finest armies in the world, I sure as heck would not mess with em
 

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thinking back--thats all I have to do these days--I met some royal artillary--I think they were zealanders --in saigon I was actually afraid of those guys tough as nails
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That would be the Maori battalion you know of, for some reason they didn't take many prisoner's. These guy's are worriers (sp?), there's a lot that still are, and can be a bit on the mean side.
 

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I remember those guys were as tough as the vc, I think yea---royal artillary- those guys were plain scary, I dont think they were maori just new zealand arty guys.my god we were all scared of em, fight like heck drink like heck, and thats from an old marine
 

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The chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) is a large, goat-like animal that lives in the European Alps and Carpathian Mountains. Chamois were successfully introduced to the South Island of New Zealand in 1907, where it has caused damage to mountain ecosystems. It is one of only two species of the genus Rupicapra, the other being the Pyrenean Chamois, Rupicapra pyrenaica. It is in the Caprinae subfamily of bovids, along with sheep and goats.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamois
 
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