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I was wondering what is a good price for a mosin? Are they a decent gun? DO I just have an addiction for collecting Russian surplus guns?:cheer:
 

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I would think less than $100 for a good arsenally refinished M38, M44, or 91/30. I just picked up my first M44 from Centerfire Systems, and 2 boxes of ammo for around $90. Sog, AIM, all seem to be around the same price range also. I'm lucky in the fact I have a dealer located within an hour drive, I dont like the idea of ordering something in the mail, not knowing what kind of condition its in until I get it. If you had no other choice but to get one at a gunshow/pawn shop, $130-$140 would be ok by me. Others might not agree, but its up to you on trusting what they send you. Now someone posted about a M44? at a pawn shop for $200, in that case the store owner needs smacked over and over again.
 

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The problem comes in not being able to inspect the rifle in most cases. What I understand under "good", "very good", or "excellent" condition is not neccesarily the definition according to the seller.

I own a 91/30 and an M44, and they came to around $120 each when the shipping and records check is figured in. I am really happy with the accuracy of the M44, but the 91/30 has a barrel that has seen better days. Both rifles were classed as "very good" condition.

I would say that a fair price for a MN would be $100 to $150 for a Russian providing the rifle is in good shape. For a Finnish MN I would Figure $250 to be a fair price. There is no way to justify the $300 and up prices that I have seen when you consider that there were probably 50 million of them made.

If your MN has no problems there is no reason that it should not shoot minute of angle. They are very sturdy and reliable rifles even if they do not have the "sleek" lines of other milsurp rifles, but they shoot well, and they cost less to feed than most.
 

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Oh, I ran across something the other day I'd never seen or heard of before. I was out at my Dads looking through his gun cabinet when I came across a Mauser. I asked him about it and he told me to take another look. What do ya know, the barrel is the size of one of my 12 gauges sitting next to it, !!!? He said the Germans transformed some Mausers after the war into a bolt action shotgun. News to me. How much would something like that be worth?
 

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Sounds very rare. It would be best to search about it on the internet, unless someone hear konws. Perssonally, i have NEVER heard of any such rifle. That sounds very cool though
 

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It has indeed been done. I believe that Timberwolf showed me a pic of an Enfield that they had converted to .410 to quell rambunctious rioters.

The answer to what such a shotgun would be worth... Whatever someone would pay for it.
 

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If you get a chance, get the new Southern Ohio Gun catalog and look at the prices on new MN rifles. I just got the new issue today. I have plenty to drool over again this month.
 

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OK. So it's new pre-owned. What do they want for them in Ohio?

I have been thinking about rebarreling my 91/30, but for the same money (and less aggravation) I might as well play the "online Mosin Nagant crapshoot" again.

A friend of mine owns a Finn ex-sniper, and that baby shoots cloverleaves at a hundred yards.
 

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True, $100 will definately be enough for a decent Mosin. Personally, I've seen my friend get a M44 carbine for as cheap as $65 at the gunshow and I think it was a great buy. The thing with the Mosin Nagants is that they're just a really simple and expensive rifle... yet are VERY powerful. If you fire a carbine, you'll see what I'm talking about. The noise it makes is devastating and if you get a chance to fire one at night, you'd be amused at the massive flame from the muzzle. Check out the price of the gun and the prices of surplus ammo. For casual outdoor shooting, the Mosin is a bargain and a great "first gun" if you want to start a collection of military weapons. It is a full-powered military service rifle that served with as much authority as the Mausers, Enfields, Springfields, Arisakas, and Carcanos.

Mosins can have a bit of a tight action, but only when you're cocking it. That's only on the upward stroke when your turning the bolt upward to open the breach. It won't simply flip open with ease because it's cocking it and will require you to give it a firm grip, but beyond that the bolt action is nearly effortless. It's easy to load the 5 rounds into the magazine and I believe you can find stripper clips if you'd like to try that. The sights are typical and work much like the sights on the SKS and AK47 which came after the Mosin. I can't recall the trigger pull being tight or smooth... it's just kinda there. Pull it and it goes BOOM...and boy does it ever. 7.62x54mm Russian compares quite favorably to 30-06 in terms of power and as I said, the carbine models are brutal. The one I fired had the flip-out bayonet on the right side that locks into place around the muzzle. I've never seen very many with scopes, but I can tell you that the straight bolt handle does cause a problem as any scope mounted directly over the breech is going to be in the way. The sniper variants are much more expensive and have a bent bolt handle to cure that problem and of course, you can no longer us the stripper clip with the scope in the way.

Overall, it's a fun rifle and cheap to buy and it's a must for any collection. If you'd like to get a more historic feel for the Mosin Nagant, try watching "Enemy At the Gates." After watching that movie, you may even be tempted to invest in a sniper model.
 

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Arisakas are a bad choice for anything else besides a wall hanger. Not that accurate, reliable, and rounds prices go through the celing at if your lucky 1.25-1.75 per round.
 

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006, i own a m44 and a m91/30(addicted. I need more before i start getting withdrawl). Anywho, i have fired 80 rounds in a day, but it does hurt later on although if you just hold it nice and tight into the shoulder, you wont get hurt that bad. Me and my dad let a kid fire probably about a year older than me(around 15 or so) and he was firing a .22 and when he shot the mosin, he held it like a .22(loose to the shoulder) and he got hurt in two rounds. The second one bucked the round probably over the massive dirt pile. Anyways, after all that rambling, it is mainly how you hold the gun, and some others chose to use shoulder protection. It is how you manage recoil how you dont get hurt. A lot of people i have met on the range make a bigger deal of recoil that need be. Just imagine how those russians felt firing hundreds of rounds a day.
 

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FutureMarine said:
Arisakas are a bad choice for anything else besides a wall hanger. Not that accurate, reliable, and rounds prices go through the celing at if your lucky 1.25-1.75 per round.
Strictly speaking this is untrue. The late "Last Ditch" Arisakas are certainly questionable at best, yet the rifles produced before and early in the war were definately no worse than any other countries', and a whole lot better than some.
 

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out of curiosity, what qualities do they have that make them good. I've seen interviews of old japanese soldiers about their rifle on the history channel and they said their rifle had the qualities i listed above
 

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Yes, shooting a Mosin carbine can be rough but holding it tight like you would any 12 gauge shotgun makes it easier to handle. I tend to wear a leather jacket that helps cushion my shoulder a bit. It's funny because one of my friends is a pretty big guy and he doesn't like shooting the Mosin from the shoulder when I insist on it.

As for the Arisaka, I'd have to defend them a bit because I do own one. My grandfather brought back a nice Type 99, and yes NICE... not one of those welded up buggers with the crappy safety knob and wood buttplate. This gun is perfect aside from the missing mono-pod and such although it does have a very rare bakelite muzzle cap.

These rifles are bringing more money than what they used to but usually not over $200. Mine had the dust cover over the breech and I took it off to make the bolt cycle better, as I suspect many Japanese soldiers did. The bolt is a bit heavy and tight, kinda clunky and awkward to cycle but it's a good solid rifle and I think the sites are neat, although very simple. This one has a flip-up rear sight that you can adjust for elevation and two arms that flip out to the right and left, providing a horizontal guide by which to provide a lead when firing at aircraft... or so they were intended. The 7.7mm round is as lethal as any, but very pricey. It's hard to find ammo for less than $25 if not $30 for a box of 20 rounds. Needless to say, I've only fired it a handful of times so it primary sits on the gunrack and looks pretty. Nice conversation piece but not a very practical shooter.

One little note... the wood used in Arisaka's are very closely related to poison ivy. I can't recall the name of the wood but you're into refinishing stocks and such and ever decide to work on an Arisaka, be sure to protect yourself from any sanded and bare wood. It WILL cause a nasty, itchy rash.
 

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FutureMarine said:
out of curiosity, what qualities do they have that make them good. I've seen interviews of old japanese soldiers about their rifle on the history channel and they said their rifle had the qualities i listed above
What those old soldiers said was in all probability true. The weapons they had were crappy because they were made cheaply when Japan was feeling the pinch. The rifles made prior to and during the first stages of the war were of a far higher quality than the "last ditch" Japan-rosing-wal-prease-rock-up-mama-san lifres.

If I had a Ford or a Chevvy that turned out to be a lemon, would it be fair to say that all Fords or Chevrolets are lemons?

006: Does your rifle have the crysanthemum crest?
 

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Typically, the WORST were the late model Type 99's. The 99 was a replacement to be cheaper made and I suppose the larger 7.7mm was bumped up there to surpass the 6.5mm. If you're gonna build it cheap, then I guess it may as well be more potent. But... the late 99's were manufactured by some of the most unqualified people... and they show it. The sights are much more simple and the safety doesn't have the fancy engraving that my example has.

If I were to ever buy a Japanese weapon from WWII, I personally like the little Nambu pistol. It wasn't very powerful but it did at least work compared to some of their creations. The rifles would be fun to shoot if someone could make the ammo for cheap. I believe most now are modified from 30-06 casings.
 
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