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Well, first off a lot of people don't know the difference between trap and skeet. The difference is the format of how the clay birds are deployed. Skeet tends to have birds thrown from a high house and a low house and thrown in crossing patterns in front of the shooter. Trap the throwing house is usually 16 yards in front of a station of 5 shooters each shooter shoots 1 round the next shooter to the right shoots 1 then the next to the right until 5 shots have been shot then each shooter moves right the right guy goes to the left. All shooters shoot 5 at each position until 25 rounds are shot by each shooter. The birds are basically thrown in a straight outward pattern with little variations in height but vary from left to right. Then there is also sporting clays . Something I know little of. There is also informal clay bird shooting where a couple of friends get together with a box or two of birds and shells some use a hand operated thrower. Some throw them by hand. Some use a board and a hockey stick.
I hope I answered some of your questions. Welcome to G&G !
 

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"Some use a board and a hockey stick" (tried to cut and quote but it just wasn't to be).
Hockey and guns, it don't get any better!!
 
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As I understand it, the difference between Skeet and Trap is the number and direction the clay birds are thrown?
I never could shoot "on the wing".
 

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As I understand it, the difference between Skeet and Trap is the number and direction the clay birds are thrown?
I never could shoot "on the wing".

I just showed up where I was told to go, and followed whatever rules I was given. Skeet and Trap were all the same to me, and I competed for a few years in both as a kid - as well as "rabbit trap" - which is a ground-based clays event.

Here is the only advice I give:

1.) Get a gun that points naturally for you, and does not beat you up; shoot it a lot. For me the Remington 1100 in 12 ga. was the gold standard. The kick is mild, it points well, and I could hit with it. Find what you like, stick with it, and ignore anyone with more money, or opinions, about your gun than what I put into that first sentence.

2.) Make friends with someone into the sport - but not TOO into it. You want a shooting partner who will challenge you, but who won't do their best to turn you into their clone. My technique was terrible according to every "expert" I met, but I generally scored fourth or better in tournaments against guys who had actual coaches, as well as some of these adult "experts" (I was between 12 and 15). I just had my dad who told me to stand in a way that was stable, comfortable, and allowed for movement. As long as I could hit I must be doing something right.
When you are learning, follow the advice of people who are doing better. If you are doing better than the pack, ignore anyone who tells you you are doing it wrong.

3.) There are reflexive, or wing shooters (me) and there are trackers (my dad) figure out which one you are better at and honestly watch someone who is good at that. Just go to events and watch. I spent a lot of time on ranges without actually firing on the line.

4.) Get your own thrower or launcher and someone to run it. Get a thrower as close to the one you will be using in competition as possible (unless you're just planning on shooting with friends). At the smaller events they always used the same manual thrower we had at home. I thought I was awesome at these events.
I qualified for a big event at a fancy range and the electric thrower, something totally new to me at that point in my life, threw the first two out so fast they were on the horizon before I could react. I had one of the worst showings there ever.
Dad bought a fancy-pants electric thrower after that and I pretty much had to re-train my reaction speed.

5.) Try to relax and have fun. At some events we would all give each other a hard time and throw out taunts and insults. This was fine and I could mostly ignore it, or join in. It only really bothered me if I got the giggles and couldn't stop. When someone told me I made an amazing shot, however, (like the time the guy hit the switch while I was still loading, and I managed to bust two from the hip) that was the end of my day. If anyone ever gave me an attaboy I couldn't hit anything smaller or faster than a derelict dump truck for the rest of the day.
 

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Do ya pluck 'em or skin 'em? ;)
 
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Hhhmmm, apparently you've never played Nintendo's Duck Hunt (1984) :p ...


 
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Skeet and Snipe both taste about the same. The big difference in hunting them is using a gun for Skeet because they're fast, and using a pillow case for Snipe because they're so slow.
 

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this might help.
they also have some diagrams and stuff of the other disciplines of shot gunning.
http://www.skylinegunclub.org/shooting-at-sgc/skeet
useful information. And these:

http://www.scskeet.com/Beginner_skeet/Beginner_Skeet.htm

https://www.gearhunder.com/clay-pigeon-thrower/

I am also a novice shooter. In my first shot last week, I found it so interesting. I can't wait to get more shots, for which I am prepared to get an automatic throw. Small, cheap throwers are what I want. Does anyone have experience with Trius One Step Trap or any other thrower? Thanks in advance.
 

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try to stay away from those single ground type throwers.
you'll wear yourself out cocking them and then trying to throw the target by yourself gets kind of old.

I done a lot of it that way when I was younger, and I suppose it helped me get some better at shooting, but all the targets were pretty close.
 

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Trap shooting dates to the 17th Century. Live pigeons were used until the 1960s in America. When the Live Pigeon shoots ended there would be hundreds of missed pigeons. We could afford the free ones on Monday.
 

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Me I do not like skeet shooting at all. Like I told My clays partner once when he asked if I wanted to do a round. I have never ever seen a grouse or Phesant fly a crossing pattern like thos clay birds do and station 8 is a friggin joke.

Sporting clays is Ok if you do it like it was first interduced.
Step into the stand load 2 rounds in th shot gun do not premount the shot gun. call for the bird nd mount the shot gun at that point.

Every course is different and some courses are different every week/end.

I like trap in you can figure out a good bit of what you shot gun is doing shooting high, right on or shooting low.

:D Al
 

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My idea of shot gun fun is hunting Louisiana swamp rabbits in heavy brush. They stay hidden until you're right on 'em, then move so fast into the next brush pile that you have just about the time it takes to say "woops" to get a shot off.:p
 
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