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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Because I like nice guns of all kinds I suppose. In another post, I mentioned my purchase of a NIB Winchester Model 100 in 308 which is at my FFL's right now and I will pick it up shortly. It's a hunting rifle but I just thought it was sleek and classic and would be fun to shoot assuming the .308 recoil is reduced by the gas operated breech.

Entirely by accident I thought I was looking also at Remington's 742 but found the Remington Wingmaster influence, especially at the fore-end, not my cup of aesthetics. I know those guns are made for the business of hunting but my search turned up a Model Four that literally made my me do a cartoon double take.

The gun comes from The Mead Collection of Howard and Nancy Mead, who are nationally known conservationists and founders of Wisconsin Trails Magazine. The Meads are donating the proceeds from the sale of their firearm collection to the Aldo Leopold Foundation (ALF). Aldo Leopold is considered by many to be the father of wildlife ecology and the United States’ wilderness system, Aldo Leopold was a conservationist, forester, philosopher, educator, writer, and outdoor enthusiast. Among his best known ideas is the “land ethic,” which calls for an ethical, caring relationship between people and nature.

Reason enough right there to buy it as a compliment to the Winchester 100 ... not to mention this:

Air gun Trigger Shotgun Gun barrel Gun accessory


Air gun Trigger Bicycle part Gun accessory Auto part

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish String instrument
Wood Everyday carry Rectangle Gadget Communication Device


Arm Wood Watch Nail Wrist

Yeah, it's a 30.06 but I'll suck it up with a slip on recoil pad and hope the gas systems makes it shootable for me. I really like the 30.06 cartridge head embedded in the action. That's something I'd love to do to all my rifles.
 

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That’s a beautiful rifle!
Doesn’t need a recoil pad. Just keep it tight against the shoulder. People nicknamed these a jam-a-matic as they tend to not cycle periodically. That’s due to not holding it tight to the shoulder. I’ve had one for decades and never had an issue with recoil or “jamming”.
 

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Very nice rifle, yet not my preference; he bought that rifle as an investment. You will pay more than he paid for it, if you so choose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very nice rifle, yet not my preference; he bought that rifle as an investment. You will pay more than he paid for it, if you so choose.
Seller has been acting as broker for the estate. I bought it for a lot less than the 80% condition average on TrueGun and was very surprised at the low asking price.
 

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I assume you have not shot it yet. They have very little recoil, about like a 243. The reason is the slow way the action comes back and the gas is released. They are by far the least kicking 30-06 on the planet.

I bought the 7400 in the carbine, same as that one but with an 18 inch barrel. I made over 20 one shot kills on whitetail, mule deer, antelope, and one elk, that actually took three rounds, all good shots, just did not go down immediately. I made more great shots with that gun that any other. I killed two Boone and Crockett mule deer with it. I killed a white tail at 460 yards with it by holding about 4 foot tall. I knew the range and got lucky.

The reason I had such luck with the gun was because the recoil is so mild, you will see. Mine shot the 168 grain Winchester Silvertips inside 1/2 inch at 100 yards. It shot the 180 grain Remington Core Lokts under an inch, so I never bothered to develop a load for it.

People ask what idiot would get rid of that gun? Well, it was pretty well worn and a guy offered me a Ruger Redhawk in an even trade and I moved on to a 257 Weatherby I got as a retirement gift, so it was not being used. . We both got a good deal. You will love that gun. Just keep that chamber squeaky clean.

And congrats, you will not find another that nice.
 

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onthepaper: Sir; I know nothing 🤓

CONTACT US
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Morgan, UT 84050
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801-876-2711
 

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onthepaper: Sir; adding 😁 a good read 🤓


The Winchester Model 100,
A Classic Rifle

By Ed Turner


This is a classic Winchester rifle I have enjoyed for years. It was last produced in 1973, so many of the newer hunters among us has never seen nor heard of this classy semi-auto. It is unlike any other high powered semi-auto in that it wears a nice one-piece stock, just like a typical bolt rifle. It makes the sometimes misunderstood semi-auto look a bit more civilized.

That is actually the reason that I originally became interested in this rifle; it's classy looks compared to most other autoloaders. Winchester brought out the Model 100 in 1961 as a kind of companion to their Model 88 lever action, which debuted in 1955). It too, wears a one-piece stock of very similar design, except that the semi-auto has a fuller forend to contain the working mechanism. The same two checkering patterns, one a hand checkered point pattern and the other a fancier basket weave impressed design, were used on both rifles. The cut checkering was used prior to 1964 and, as a cost cutting method, the basket weave pattern after 1964.
 

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Have a Remington Model Four in .270 Win. bought back new in 81. Never had an issue with feeding or ejection so far. Keep in mind gas and bolt system were changed from the Model 742. Suppose to be an improvement over the older system. They listed for $450 back then but I paid $400. My book says around 68,000 were produced between 81-87. Don't know what you paid if going to purchase but seems they should go for a premium with all the walnut and high polish bluing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
onthepaper: Sir; adding 😁 a good read 🤓


The Winchester Model 100,
A Classic Rifle

By Ed Turner


This is a classic Winchester rifle I have enjoyed for years. It was last produced in 1973, so many of the newer hunters among us has never seen nor heard of this classy semi-auto. It is unlike any other high powered semi-auto in that it wears a nice one-piece stock, just like a typical bolt rifle. It makes the sometimes misunderstood semi-auto look a bit more civilized.

That is actually the reason that I originally became interested in this rifle; it's classy looks compared to most other autoloaders. Winchester brought out the Model 100 in 1961 as a kind of companion to their Model 88 lever action, which debuted in 1955). It too, wears a one-piece stock of very similar design, except that the semi-auto has a fuller forend to contain the working mechanism. The same two checkering patterns, one a hand checkered point pattern and the other a fancier basket weave impressed design, were used on both rifles. The cut checkering was used prior to 1964 and, as a cost cutting method, the basket weave pattern after 1964.
Good read, Most interesting that his first one jammed ith every shot and the second one worked reliably. Hoping mine is in the latter club.
 
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