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This has my curiosity piqued. My latest lust is for a new lever action in 44 mag (not interested in a single shot). Would love to find a Winchester 1892 case hardened takedown Trapper. Absolutely zero available anywhere. Nada. Expanded my horizons and looked for a Marlin 1894 CSBL (the one with the big loop, stainless, laminated). Zippo. In fact, if you’re in the market for a 44 magnum lever action, shelves are pretty much a desert. Closest I came was one over-priced Rossi R92.

So new lever actions in 44 mag are almost entirely sold out across the country… except for Henry rifles. For some odd reason, there doesn’t appear to be any kind of shortage whatsoever when it comes to Henry lever actions.

I don’t get it. Why are Henry lever rifles so readily available, and not the others? Anyone have any ideas why?

A few examples:

https://salidagunshop.com/product-category-2/lever-action-rifles?attribute_filter[Brand]=Henry+Repeating+Arms&attribute_filter[Caliber/Gauge]=.44+REM+MAG&attribute_filter[Condition]=New&attribute_filter[Model]=&attribute_filter[Type]=

https://www.hinterlandoutfitters.com/henry-44magspl-large-loop-p-80521.html

https://gunprime.com/products/henry-repeating-arms-big-boy-44-mag-god-bless-america-h006gba

https://www.nwarmory.com/product/he...erican-walnut-stk-blued-barrelnickel-receiver

https://lockedloaded.com/product/he...merican-walnut-stk-brass-receiverblued-barrel

https://www.cabelas.com/shop/en/Fir...Id=79723&quantity=1&parentPartNumber=10218078

https://www.guns.com/firearms/rifle...AvantLink&utm_campaign=35987&utm_medium=df_NA
 

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Where are the Henry rifles available? We've been trying to get them for months now. We've been told by two different suppliers that due to the fact so much Henry production is out of New Jersey, and New Jersey is still on lockdown, it is nearly impossible for them to get any.

If your local LGS has a pile of them I might need to see about getting some transferred here, or see where they are getting them.
 

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This has my curiosity piqued. My latest lust is for a new lever action in 44 mag (not interested in a single shot). Would love to find a Winchester 1892 case hardened takedown Trapper. Absolutely zero available anywhere. Nada. Expanded my horizons and looked for a Marlin 1894 CSBL (the one with the big loop, stainless, laminated). Zippo. In fact, if you’re in the market for a 44 magnum lever action, shelves are pretty much a desert. Closest I came was one over-priced Rossi R92.

So new lever actions in 44 mag are almost entirely sold out across the country… except for Henry rifles. For some odd reason, there doesn’t appear to be any kind of shortage whatsoever when it comes to Henry lever actions.

I don’t get it. Why are Henry lever rifles so readily available, and not the others? Anyone have any ideas why?
Supply exceeds demand. Folks know what they like, and what they trust.

I own a Henry Lever 22LR, for a SHTF "pest control" gun, because it will shoot 22 Shorts, Longs and Long Rifle. Other than that, I would rather have a Marlin.

I have owned Marlin, Winchester, Rossi, and Henry lever guns of many different calibers. I still prefer the Marlins. However, Marlins are now VERY EXPENSIVE, because they are not made anymore.

Winchester went under. Marlin was bought out and ruined, Rossi is small production. All that is left is Henry, to fill the "lever action" void.

If Henry rifles are readily available, it's not just because they are producing so many of them.
 

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Maybe Ruger will bring life back to Marlin and give Henry a run for their money.
Maybe, but in all honesty in my opinion, I dont see that happening.
It depends SOLELY on whether or not Ruger Management thinks they can make a hefty profit on doing so.

IF, and it's a BIG IF, Ruger DID decide to gin up Marlin production, and IF they DID make them high quality, and IF they DID make them competitively priced against Henry, THEN they would make a killing, and leave Henry in the dust. The Marlin design is just better than the Henry, in my opinion.

NOTE: THERE ARE A LOT OF "IFs" in my statement! LOL!!!!!
 

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It depends SOLELY on whether or not Ruger Management thinks they can make a hefty profit on doing so.

IF, and it's a BIG IF, Ruger DID decide to gin up Marlin production, and IF they DID make them high quality, and IF they DID make them competitively priced against Henry, THEN they would make a killing, and leave Henry in the dust. The Marlin design is just better than the Henry, in my opinion.

NOTE: THERE ARE A LOT OF "IFs" in my statement! LOL!!!!!
I hear you but to be honest again, I have owned marlin and Henry rifles and in my opinion, marlin quality sucked in comparison to the quality of Henry products. I will never own another marlin product even if some one wants to give one to me! The quality of their products is just so bad compared to the quality of the Henry products! ;)
 

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I hear you but to be honest again, I have owned marlin and Henry rifles and in my opinion, marlin quality sucked in comparison to the quality of Henry products. I will never own another marlin product even if some one wants to give one to me! The quality of their products is just so bad compared to the quality of the Henry products! ;)
Depends on WHEN the Marlin was made.
 

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I hear you but to be honest again, I have owned marlin and Henry rifles and in my opinion, marlin quality sucked in comparison to the quality of Henry products. I will never own another marlin product even some one wants to give one to me! ;)
If someone offers to give you a Marlin 30-30, I'll take it and will even pay shipping.lol
 

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The John Browning designed 92 lever-action is a little honey. Smooth, sturdy and, possibly through a happy accident of design, capable of handling straight walled Magnum handgun cartridges. I've own a Winchester 1892 in .32-20 for many fun filled years and have enjoyed viewing and shooting friends' Winchester reissues of the 92 lever-action as well as the Browning and Rossi clones in .32-20, 357 Magnum, and .44 Magnum. Any of 'em are highly recommended and well worth holding out for!



Apparently there are Marlins and then there are late vintage Marlins and "never the twain shall meet."

I once bought a brand new Marlin Model 1894 CL .32-20 in about 1990. It was pretty wretched: hard trigger, factory manufacturing flaw in bore, rough action, the idiot safety. That rifle had to go away as it was a disappointing bust. The old Winchester '92 cast shade over it. There's much grousing to be seen about new Marlins around the internet firearms forums for more than a decade now. I have no personal experience with any of them.


Traditional vintage Marlins are first rate. I'm willing to own a 1953 vintage Marlin Model 39A .22. It exhibits quality workmanship, gives smooth function, and its pleasingly accurate.

Observation of the design causes me to not be willing to own a Henry of any type. Some of the models look great, but underneath they seem cheap-o.

Only one opinion and I've not looked at any Henry rifles in some years.
 

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The John Browning designed 92 lever-action is a little honey. Smooth, sturdy and, possibly through a happy accident of design, capable of handling straight walled Magnum handgun cartridges. I've own a Winchester 1892 in .32-20 for many fun filled years and have enjoyed viewing and shooting friends' Winchester reissues of the 92 lever-action as well as the Browning and Rossi clones in .32-20, 357 Magnum, and .44 Magnum. Any of 'em are highly recommended and well worth holding out for!



Apparently there are Marlins and then there are late vintage Marlins and "never the twain shall meet."

I once bought a brand new Marlin Model 1894 CL .32-20 in about 1990. It was pretty wretched: hard trigger, factory manufacturing flaw in bore, rough action, the idiot safety. That rifle had to go away as it was a disappointing bust. The old Winchester '92 cast shade over it. There's much grousing to be seen about new Marlins around the internet firearms forums for more than a decade now. I have no personal experience with any of them.


Traditional vintage Marlins are first rate. I'm willing to own a 1953 vintage Marlin Model 39A .22. It exhibits quality workmanship, gives smooth function, and its pleasingly accurate.

Observation of the design causes me to not be willing to own a Henry of any type. Some of the models look great, but underneath they seem cheap-o.

Only one opinion and I've not looked at any Henry rifles in some years.

Marlin had some rough years. Their pre-1964 stuff was fantastic, then they were a little hit and miss on certain models from the mid '70s until the mid '90s. I don't know why, but they had a fantastic run from around 1994 to 1998, and if you get one of their "Cowboy" models from that period they are some of the smoothest, prettiest Marlins in history. From then on they were still pretty good until Remington ruined them.

At this point, I wish Savage would come back with a 99 and I wish Mossberg, since they are already making some nice American-made Winchester clones, would make a model 1895 clone. I would not at all mind having a lever gun that could fire spitzers.
 

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The John Browning designed 92 lever-action is a little honey. Smooth, sturdy and, possibly through a happy accident of design, capable of handling straight walled Magnum handgun cartridges. I've own a Winchester 1892 in .32-20 for many fun filled years and have enjoyed viewing and shooting friends' Winchester reissues of the 92 lever-action as well as the Browning and Rossi clones in .32-20, 357 Magnum, and .44 Magnum. Any of 'em are highly recommended and well worth holding out for!



Apparently there are Marlins and then there are late vintage Marlins and "never the twain shall meet."

I once bought a brand new Marlin Model 1894 CL .32-20 in about 1990. It was pretty wretched: hard trigger, factory manufacturing flaw in bore, rough action, the idiot safety. That rifle had to go away as it was a disappointing bust. The old Winchester '92 cast shade over it. There's much grousing to be seen about new Marlins around the internet firearms forums for more than a decade now. I have no personal experience with any of them.


Traditional vintage Marlins are first rate. I'm willing to own a 1953 vintage Marlin Model 39A .22. It exhibits quality workmanship, gives smooth function, and its pleasingly accurate.

Observation of the design causes me to not be willing to own a Henry of any type. Some of the models look great, but underneath they seem cheap-o.

Only one opinion and I've not looked at any Henry rifles in some years.
I have two of the Marlin M#39A rifles. I bought one about 8 years ago and another about 3 years ago. Both were made in the 50's and look newer condition wise. Hard to find one anymore.
 

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I'd happily take the Henry. Good company, good President, good warranty, and good guns. What's not to like?
 

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I haven't seen any Henry lever guns at my local gun shop in awhile. The only Henrys they consistently have in stock are the AR-7 .22 LR survival rifles. Might be that's because it's what the locals want; might be they can't get any Henry lever actions, I don't know.
 
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I have a 'recent' Marlin 336C. 3 years old? It's been nothing but flawless, so far. Guess that's the luck of the draw.
 

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I have a few Henry rifles at least but I also have like four other brand lever actions. There is a few others I want to try and own one day.
 

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I haven't seen any Henry lever guns at my local gun shop in awhile. The only Henrys they consistently have in stock are the AR-7 .22 LR survival rifles. Might be that's because it's what the locals want; might be they can't get any Henry lever actions, I don't know.
Those and some of the single shots are supposedly made in the Wisconsin factory, which saved it from the fate of New Jersey, maybe.
 
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