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Hi everyone, My name is Larry. I live just outside Boston, MA. I’m new here. I’ve loved reading the posts and learning so much.

Can anyone help me understand what I have hear? From the markings, it is a Winchester 1894 with a serial number that indicates it was manufactured in the early 1900’s. All the photos I’ve seen have a tubular magazine that is below the barrel and almost as long. Yet this one has a cap instead of the magazine (that appears to have the same finish as the rest of the rifle). I’m confused. Any help is appreciated.
 

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that's a rare "sporting" version of the 1894. it was made that way. I think they only hold 3-4 rounds in the tube.I don't know much about them but I'm sure someone will come along that does. this forum is a wealth of info.
 

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here is a model 64 for comparison.
upload_2019-9-26_20-26-53.jpeg


here is a model 94 takedown model.
notice the little rod with the hook on the end.
 

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Over the years Winchester has made the Model 94 in several different configurations. Your's was made that way, and that may or may not add a little value to your rifle.
 

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I was going to say that looks like a model 64.
There was something about transition rifles lead bullet vs. Jacketed bullets where the barrel being blued and the receiver being in the white for the old unjacketed bullets.
 

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the 94 has always been a jacketed bullet rifle, as has the 30-30 round from the factory.
remember it was thee speed demon of it's day.

the 32 win. is the one rumored to have been designed for using either smokeless or black powder.
I don't think it ever come as a factory load with a cast bullet though. [and may never have been a black powder load either]
 

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According to the Blue Book, this version of the 1894 was only made until 1925 when it was simplified and re-designated as a Model 55. The Blue Book does not list values for either model.

One of the Winchester collector forums claims the value is between $800 and $2,400 and does not differentiate a price difference between the 1894 and the 55, which would be quite a bit less than the more common standard 1894 model.

As nuts as Winchester collectors are for variants, this doesn't sound right.
 

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it's cause it would have been a variant of something you could just order.

you could get the 94 with any option you wanted, not all of them were catalogued.
so you basically called or more likely wrote them a letter for a quote telling them what you wanted on your rifle.
stocks,sights,magazine,take-down, engraving, barrel type-length.
they'd figure it up and mail you an itemized price list.
you ordered what you could afford or wanted sent the check [or sometimes cash]and waited for it to come to the post office.
 
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According to the Blue Book, this version of the 1894 was only made until 1925 when it was simplified and re-designated as a Model 55. The Blue Book does not list values for either model.

One of the Winchester collector forums claims the value is between $800 and $2,400 and does not differentiate a price difference between the 1894 and the 55, which would be quite a bit less than the more common standard 1894 model.

As nuts as Winchester collectors are for variants, this doesn't sound right.
That is a "Button Magazine Mdl 94". Many were special order. These rifles many are now 120 years old are a prize to own. The Buffalo Bill Museum here in Cody, Wyoming has the records of these rifles. They will trace your rifle and issue a very valuable letter for $75 Dollars. No guess work. :usa2:
 

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it's cause it would have been a variant of something you could just order.

you could get the 94 with any option you wanted, not all of them were catalogued.
so you basically called or more likely wrote them a letter for a quote telling them what you wanted on your rifle.
stocks,sights,magazine,take-down, engraving, barrel type-length.
they'd figure it up and mail you an itemized price list.
you ordered what you could afford or wanted sent the check [or sometimes cash]and waited for it to come to the post office.
I don't think so. They did these in an actual separate serial number range for most of the life of the product, and they made 20,800-ish of them specifically like this before switching to the 55 designation.

The 55 gets a little more complicated because it was actually sold as a different model altogether, at first, continuing that number system. Then at some point toward the end it was both a separate catalog item AND, for some reason, had the serials re-integrated with the standard 1894 line until the model was discontinued altogether.

Even weirder, according to the book, the take down 1894, which is a very valuable gun, is actually a variant of this model, and made on this line, but it used standard 1894 serials.

What makes that especially weird to me is that the takedown is a valuable variant of the 1894, but it turns out it is actually a variant of the much less valuable proto-55 version.

Basically, this version started as a variant for a year or two, became a separate entity with the same name - but a different serial range, and after gaining its own model designation it somehow became a variant again - despite a different name.

Then, the takedown was its own weird situation.
 

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they might have been receiving enough 'code-55' orders to just give it's own model number in the catalogue.

kind of like the Z-28 Camaro's.
they become a popular enough option package they just went ahead and put the code right on the fender instead of just in the Vin number.
then later they went back to an options package as the sales dropped off.

I have a SKB 505 trap gun.
the 505 was always a field model, they decided to do a plain jane trap gun and used the 505 designation.
they only made the trap combo model for maybe 2 years then went back to the 505 and 605 as field models.
 

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Interesting about how the '.30-30 came about. Winchester put the rifle out as a .30 WCF. Marlin, being a competitor, didn't want to produce ammo for the gun and call it .30 WCF, so they dubbed it .30-30.
 
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