World War 11 Medal of Honor Awardees

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Marine1, May 11, 2008.

  1. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    This thread will focus on the Medal of Honor Awardees, from World War 11 and on. I will continue posting photos on all threads of the Military Photos Forum, when I come across them during my research.

    This thread will have the background on each veteran as to what the achievement was for the issuance of each award, providing the data is also located or available.

    1. Medal of Honor: WW-1 Design

    2. Medal of Honor: 1940's - 1950's Design

    3. John Philip Cromwell; Following promotion to Captain, he went to sea in USS Sculpin as prospective commander of a mid-Pacific submarine wolf pack. While attacking a Japanese convoy on 19 November 1943, Sculpin (SS-129) was forced to the surface, fatally damaged in a gun battle and abandoned by her surviving crew members. Captain Cromwell, who knew secret details of the impending operation to capture the Gilbert Islands, deliberately remained on board as she sank. For his sacrificial heroism in preventing the enemy from obtaining this information.

    4. Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone; In September 1942 Sgt. Basilone landed on the southern Pacific island of Guadalcanal to participate in the ongoing campaign to hold the airfield there against Japanese attempts to recapture it. On the night of 24-25 October 1942, during a vigorous enemy assault on the Marines' defensive perimeter, he was responsible for a section of machine guns. His "extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry" in keeping his guns in action in the face of heavy attacks contributed greatly to the failure of the Japanese offensive. Following his service on Guadalcanal, Basilone was assigned to U.S. Marine units in California and at the Washington Navy Yard D.C. Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone was killed in action during the February 1945 invasion of Iwo Jima.

    5. Charles Joseph Berry; With the First Battalion, Twenty-sixth Marines, Fifth Marine Division, Corporal Berry landed on Iwo Jima on 19 February 1945 and took part in nearly two weeks of combat as a machine-gun crew member. On 3 March, when Japanese troops attacked his position with grenades, he threw the the explosive weapons back at to the enemy until one grenade landed in his foxhole. Berry promptly dived on it, sacrificing his life to save others from serious injury.

    6. Owen Francis Patrick Hammerberg; On 17 February 1945, during salvage operations in Pearl Harbor, he lost his life while heroically working to rescue two fellow divers.
     

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    Last edited: May 12, 2008
  2. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    1. Thomas James Reeves; During the 7 December 1941 Japanese air raid on Pearl Harbor, he was serving on board USS California (BB-44). When the ship was bombed, torpedoed and set afire, Chief Petty Officer Reeves assisted in the supply of ammunition until overcome by smoke and fire. For this act of sacrifice and heroism, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

    2. Reinhardt J. Keppler; When a Japanese bomber crashed into his ship on 12 November 1942, at the beginning of the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, he assisted in caring for the resulting casualties. That night, as San Francisco participated in a chaotic battle with enemy warships, he labored valiantly, despite mortal wounds, to save his ship and wounded shipmates.

    3. Richard Nott Antrim; Though wounded, Lieutenant Antrim led the ship's survivors as they drifted at sea for three days, until the enemy picked them up and took them to a prisoner of war facility at Makassar, Celebes. In April 1942, when a fellow officer was being viciously beaten and close to death, Antrim bravely stepped forward and offered to take the rest of the punishment, stunning the Japanese guards, inspiring the Allied prisoners, and creating among the enemy a new-found respect for their American captives.

    4. Elmer C. Bigelow; 14 February 1945. Standing topside when an enemy shell struck the Fletcher, BIGELOW, acting instantly as the deadly projectile exploded into fragments which penetrated the No. 1 gun magazine and set fire to several powder cases, picked up a pair of fire extinguishers and rushed below in a resolute attempt to quell the raging flames. Refusing to waste the precious time required to don rescue-breathing apparatus, he plunged through the blinding smoke billowing out of the magazine hatch and dropped into the blazing compartment. Despite the acrid, burning powder smoke which seared his lungs with every agonizing breath, he worked rapidly and with instinctive sureness and succeeded in quickly extinguishing the fires and in cooling the cases and bulkheads, thereby preventing further damage to the stricken ship. Although he succumbed to his injuries on the following day, BIGELOW, by his dauntless valor, unfaltering skill and prompt action in the critical emergency, had averted a magazine explosion which undoubtedly would have left his ship wallowing at the mercy of the furiously pounding Japanese guns on Corregidor.

    5. Kenneth Dillion Bailey; In August 1942, he participated in the conquest of Tulagi, Solomon Islands, and was awarded the Silver Star for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" while leading his company after being seriously wounded. On 12-13 September, Bailey heroically directed his men on Guadalcanal when the Japanese tried to retake Henderson Field. Despite receiving a severe head wound, his unit repulsed the enemy during more than 10 hours in fierce hand-to-hand fighting. He was killed on 26 September 1942, while attacking Japanese forces at Guadalcanal's Matanikau River.

    6. Harold William Bauer; During August and September 1942, Lieutenant Colonel Bauer's squadron deployed to the newly captured island of Guadalcanal. In air combat out of that island's Henderson Field during the next few months, Bauer was credited with downing eleven Japanese aircraft, one of them on 28 September and four more on 3 October. On 16 October, arriving over Guadalcanal following a 600 mile flight from Espiritu Santo, he noticed that the seaplane tender Mc Farland was under air attack. Bauer, though already low on fuel, entered the fray and received credit for destroying four enemy planes. He played an important role in air action during the intense mid-November Japanese offensive against Guadalcanal. Forced to abandon his "Wildcat Fighter" on 14 November after shooting down two more enemy aircraft, he was seen in a life raft by other American pilots, but was not found during several days of rescue attempts.
     

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    Last edited: May 12, 2008

  3. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    1. William R. Caddy; Landing against the fanatic opposition which had characterized the Japanese since Guadalcanal, PFC Caddy went through the fighting on Iwo Jima for 12 days. On 3 March 1945, he, along with his platoon leader and his acting platoon sergeant, were advancing against shattering Japanese machine-gun and small arms fire in an isolated sector. Seeking temporary refuge from the assault, the three Marines dropped into a shell hole where they were immediately pinned down by a well-concealed enemy sniper. After several unsuccessful attempts to advance further, the 19 year-old Marine and his lieutenant engaged in a furious hand grenade battle with the defending Japanese. When an enemy grenade landed in their hole, PFC Caddy immediately covered it with his body and absorbed the deadly fragments.

    2. Darrell Samuel Cole; In the face of tremendous small-arms, artillery and mortar fire that day, Cole led his men against Japanese defenses. After the unit's progress was halted by three enemy pillboxes, he resumed the advance, at times by himself. Armed with only a pistol and grenades, he made a series of attacks against the hostile strongpoints. His third assault destroyed the Japanese position, but Cole was killed while making his way back to his squad.

    3. Robert Hugo Dunlap; While in command of Company C, First Battalion, Twenty-sixth Marines, Fifth Marine Division, Captain Dunlap participated at the Battle of Iwo Jima. On 20 February 1945, as his men advanced against Japanese forces in cliffside defenses, they were halted by opposing fire. Dunlap crawled forward alone to locate the enemy positions and provided targeting data to supporting artillery and warship guns. For the next two days and nights, he skillfully directed an intense bombardment which greatly assisted in defeating the Japanese in that sector. His efforts greatly inspired his company in their fight to achieve their objectives.

    4. Ross F. Gray; With his unit, he next took part in the bitter battle for Iwo Jima. On 21 February 1945, northeast of Airfield Number One, Gray cleared a path through heavily mined area then, while continually under fire, attacked and destroyed six Japanese emplacements with satchel charges. As the intense fight for Iwo Jima continued, Sergeant Gray was killed by an enemy shell on 27 February 1945.

    5. William George Harrell; Sergeant Harrell next took part in the Iwo Jima campaign in February and March 1945 as an assault group leader. At dawn on 3 March 1945, he repulsed an intense enemy assault on his position, fighting on despite serious injuries, including the loss of both hands to grenades.

    6. Rufus Geddie Herring; In February 1945 Herring's ship, by then designated (LCIG/49, took part in the preinvasion bombardment of Iwo Jima. On 17 February, while shelling enemy positions in support of Underwater Demolition Team swimmers, she was heavily hit by Japanese counterfire and went out of control. Despite very serious wounds that left him gravely weakened, Herring took the helm, rallied his men, and kept the ship in action.
     

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  4. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    1. Douglas Thomas Jacobson; On 26 February 1945, during the bitter fight for the latter island, Private First Class Jacobson's platoon assaulted Japanese defenses on Hill 382. Employing a Bazooka rocket launcher in a series of fearless attacks, he neutralized more than a dozen enemy positions, then helped another unit's advance by destroying more Japanese strong points and a tank.

    2. Joseph Rodolph Julian; During the Iwo Jima campaign of February and March 1945, he was assigned to First Battalion, Twenty-seventh Marines, Fifth Division. On 9 March 1945, his unit's advance was threatened by Japanese machine-gun and mortar fire. Sergeant Julian placed his platoon in supporting positions, then made a series of attacks by himself and with another Marine, destroying enemy trench defenses, cave positions and pillboxes before he was mortally wounded.

    3. James Dennis La Belle; With this unit, Private First Class La Belle participated in the battle for Iwo Jima. On 8 March 1945, while standing watch during the night, an enemy grenade landed beyond reach in La Belle's foxhole. Recognizing the peril of this situation, he dived on the grenade, sacrificing his own life to protect his fellow Marines.

    4. John Harold Leims; Battle of Iwo Jima, landing on the island on 24 February 1945 and later taking command of Company B. On 7 March, after leading his men in the capture of Japanese fortifications ahead of the front lines, Leims realized his assault platoons were isolated and personally laid telephone lines across fire-swept terrain to restore communications. When ordered to withdraw, he skillfully led his men back to the rear. Learning that casualties remained in the abandoned position, Lieutenant Leims made four more trips across the deadly battlefield to rescue two wounded Marines.

    5. Jacklyn Harrell Lucas; 19 February 1945. The following day, while creeping through a twisting ravine near the ill-defined front line, his small party was attacked by enemy troops. When two hand grenades landed in his foxhole, Lucas threw himself over one incoming grenade, then pulled the second under his body, absorbing both blasts and saving his companions. Though initially thought to be dead, he was later found to be alive and evacuated for medical treatment.

    6. Jack Lummus; With his unit, First Lieutenant Lummus landed on Iwo Jima on 19 February 1945, and he served as a rifle platoon leader during the desperate struggle for that island. On 8 March 1945, while taking his platoon forward against well-planned Japanese fortifications, enemy fire halted the advance. Lummus individually attacked and destroyed two strong Japanese positions, despite being injured in both assaults. Returning to his platoon, he made a third attack, destroying another strong point. Still moving foward against the enemy defenses, Lummus was mortally wounded by a land mine.
     

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  5. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    1. Joseph Jeremiah McCarthy; Captain McCarthy took part in the Battle of Iwo Jima as Commanding Officer of a rifle company of the Second Battalion, Twenty-Fourth Marines, Fourth Marine Division. On 21 February 1945, when Japanese defenses held up his company's advance across the island, he fearlessly led an attack across hostile terrain to annihilate a series of enemy emplacements.

    2. Harry Linn Martin; On 19 February 1945, as a platoon Leader with the Fifth Pioneer Battalion, Martin went ashore during the first day of the invasion of Iwo Jima. He was promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant on 1 March. At dawn on 26 March, as the main fighting on the island neared an end, several hundred Japanese attacked his unit's bivouac area. Martin organized resistance, rescued surrounded Marines and, until mortally wounded by a grenade, led a counterattack. For his "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life, " he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

    3. George Phillips; Phillips was assigned to the Second Battalion, Twenty-eighth Marines, FIFTH Marine Division during the battle for Iwo Jima. During the night of 14 March 1945, he was standing watch as other Marines rested when Japanese troops tossed a hand-grenade among them. Instantly realizing the gravity of the situation, Private Phillips threw himself on the grenade, sacrificing his own life to save his comrades from the blast.

    4. Donald Jack Ruhl; Private First Class Ruhl participated as a Rifleman during the Battle for Iwo Jima, landing on D-Day, 19 February 1945. During the next two days he demonstrated great bravery and initiative while attacking Japanese fortifications, scouting ahead of the lines and rescuing a wounded Marine under heavy fire. During the morning of 21 February, during an attack on enemy positions around Mount Surbachi, a grenade landed nearby. Instantly diving on the grenade, Ruhl absorbed its explosion with his body, sacrificing himself to save the lives of his fellow Marines.

    5. Franklin Earl Sigler; With this unit, Private Sigler participated in the bitter fight for Iwo Jima that began in February 1945. On 14 March 1945, after a Japanese strong point had held up his company for several days, he took over leadership of his squad when its leader became a casualty. Sigler personally charged and destroyed the stubborn enemy gun installation, then assaulted other positions that overlooked the first. Though seriously wounded, he continued to direct fire on the enemy and assisted other injured Marines until finally ordered to obtain medical treatment.

    6. Tony Stein; As a member of Company A, First Battalion, Twenty-eighth Marines, Fifth Marine Division, he landed on Iwo Jima on 19 February 1945. Immediately after coming ashore, when his platoon was halted by Japanese fire, Stein single-handedly charged a series of enemy pillboxes, deliberately exposed himself to draw fire and several times helped wounded comrades to safety as he returned to the beach for more ammunition to continue his assaults. As the battle raged on, he helped destroy a stubborn pillbox and later in the day covered the withdrawal of his platoon. On 1 March 1945, following days of intense combat on Iwo Jima, Corporal Stein was killed in action while attempting to locate enemy machine gun emplacements that were holding up his company's advance.
     

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  6. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    1. William Gary Walsh; formally assigned to a Marine Raider unit and participated in the Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands and Gilbert Islands Campaigns of 1942 and 1943. In February 1945, as Leader of an Assault Platoon attached to Company G, Third Battalion, Twenty-seventh Marines, Walsh took part in the battle for Iwo Jima. On 27 February, he led a successful uphill assault against a well-located and heavily-manned enemy stronghold. As his Marines captured the ridge, the Japanese unleashed a barrage of hand grenades, with one landing in the midst of his men. Walsh instantly dived on it and was killed, thus saving his men's lives and allowing them to hold the newly won hill.

    2. Wilson Douglas Watson; During the deadly February-March 1945 battle for Iwo Jima, Watson was an automatic rifleman with the Second Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division. On 26 and 27 February 1945, when his squad was twice halted by intense Japanese fire, Watson courageously and single-handedly destroyed a hostile pillbox and later charged uphill against enemy defenses. During the latter action, while fully exposed to Japanese fire, he used his Browning Automatic Rifle to kill sixty of the enemy, thus enabling his platoon to reach his position. On 2 March, Private Watson was seriously wounded and evacuated from Iwo Jima.

    3. Hershel Woodrow Williams; Corporal Williams was a Demolition Sergeant during the Battle for Iwo Jima. On 23 February 1945, when American tanks were held up by Japanese guns, minefields and rough island terrain, he advanced alone and, in a four hour effort while under terrific fire, utilized demolition charges and flame throwers to annihilate many enemy positions, thus enabling his company to reach its objective.

    4. Jack Williams; With the Third Battalion, Twenty-eighth Marines, Fifth Marine Division, he participated in the Battle of Iwo Jima. On 3 March 1945, when a Marine was wounded forward of the front lines, Williams courageously went to assist him and was hit by enemy fire. With determination, he completed his mission of mercy, dressed his own wounds, and rendered aid to another fallen Marine. On his way back to the rear, Williams was hit by an enemy sniper and died later that day.

    5. John Harlan Willis; On 28 February 1945, while aiding fallen Marines during a fierce action near Japanese-held Hill 362, he was wounded and ordered back to the battle-aid station. Disregarding his injuries, Willis returned to the battle area to resume casualty assistance. He was helping a wounded Marine when the enemy attacked with hand grenades. After throwing eight grenades back at the enemy, he was killed when one exploded in his hand.

    6. PFC Richard B. Anderson; On 1 February 1944, he participated in battle against the Japanese on Roi Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands. While Anderson prepared to throw a grenade, it slipped from his hands and rolled towards three fellow Marines. PFC Anderson instantly dived on the weapon, taking its explosion's full impact and sacrificing his life to save his comrades.
     

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  7. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    1. Lewis Kenneth Bausell; After his unit was withdrawn from Guadalcanal, Corporal Bausell relocated to Pavuvu Island to prepare for the next campaign, which would be the invasion of Peleliu, Palau Islands. Soon after landing there on 15 September 1944, while his squad charged a hostile pillbox to flush out the Japanese defenders, the enemy hurled a grenade among the Marines. Immediately, Bausell threw himself on it, saving the lives of his men. The mortally wouned Corporal was evacuated to the attack transport DuPage, where he died on 18 September and was buried at sea.

    2. Harold Christ Agerholm; On 7 July 1944, when Japanese forces counter-attacked and captured a neighboring position, Agerholm immediately volunteered to help evacuate the wounded . For three hours, he made repeated trips under heavy rifle and mortar fire, single-handedly evacuating approximately 45 casualities. Rushing to help what he thought were other wounded Marines, he was mortally wounded by a Japanese sniper.

    3. Medal of Honor Dress Ribbon

    4. Alexander Bonnyman Jr.; During 20-22 November 1943, Bonnyman served as the Executive Officer of the Second Battalion Shore Party, Eighth Marines, Second Marine Division and participated at the Battle of Tarawa, Gilbert Islands. For three consecutive days, he bravely led his men and assaulted the Japanese who relentlessly defended their position on Betio Island. After single-handedly crawling 40 yards forward of the front lines and setting demolitions, he was forced to withdraw for more ammunition. Bonnyman then led his men in a renewed assault and annihilated the enemy and their position until he was mortally wounded.

    5. William James Bordleon; After the Guadalcanal campaign, in May 1943, he landed with the Assault Engineer Platoon of the First Battalion, Eighteenth Marines, Second Marine Division on the fiercely-defended Japanese stronghold of Betio Island, part of Tarawa Atoll in Gilbert Islands. Despite several serious wounds received during the assault, Bordelon courageously refused medical aid and remained in action, destroying three enemy fortifications and assisting other wounded Marines. During a single-handed assault another enemy machine-gun position, he was mortally wounded.

    6. Richard Hetherington O'Kane; In July 1943, Lieutenant Commander O'Kane was detached from Wahoo and soon became Prospective Commanding Officer of USS Tang, which was then under construction. He placed her in commission in October 1943 and commanded her through her entire career. In five war patrols, O'Kane and Tang sank an officially recognized total of 24 Japanese ships, establishing one of the Pacific War's top records for submarine achievement. He was captured by the Japanese when his ship was accidently sunk off China during the night of 24-25 October 1944 and was secretly held prisoner until the war's end some ten months later. Following his release, Commander O'Kane was awarded the Medal of Honor.
     

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    Last edited: May 12, 2008
  8. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    Audie L. Murphy (Medal of Honor)

    1. Citation: Audie L. Murphy; 2nd Lt. Murphy commanded Company "B", which was attacked by (6) tanks and waves of infantry. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to prepared positions in a woods, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, one of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods.
    He continued to direct artillery fire which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, Murphy climbed aboard the burning tank destroyer, in danger of exploding at any moment, and deployed its .50 caliber machinegun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from 3 sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver.
    The enemy tanks, losing their infantry support, began to withdraw. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad which was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire.
    He received a leg wound, by ignored it, and continued the single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack which forced the Germans to withdraw.
    His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective.
    Decorations:
    Medal of Honor
    Distinguished Service Cross
    Silver Star with First Oak Leaf Cluster
    Legion of Merit
    Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device and First Oak Leaf Cluster
    Purple Heart with Second Oak Leaf Cluster
    U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal
    Good Conduct Medal
    Distinguished Unit Emblem with First Oak Leaf Cluster
    American Campaign Medal
    European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with One Silver Star, Four Bronze Service Stars (representing nine campaigns)
    Bronze Arrowhead (representing assault landing at Sicily and Southern France)
    World War II Victory Medal
    Army of Occupation Medal with Germany Clasp
    Armed Forces Reserve Medal
    Combat Infantry Badge
    Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar
    Expert Badge with Bayonet Bar
    French Fourragere in Colors of the Croix de Guerre
    French Legion of Honor, Grade of Chevalier
    French Croix de Guerre With Silver Star
    French Croix de Guerre with Palm
    Medal of Liberated France
    Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 Palm
    * Audie was killed, in a private airplane crash, on a business trip... 28 May 1971.
     

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    Last edited: May 12, 2008
  9. tbonecpk

    tbonecpk Guest

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    COLALILLO, MIKE
    Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company C, 398th Infantry, 100th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Untergriesheim, Germany, 7 April 1945. Entered service at: Duluth, Minn. Birth: Hibbing, Minn. G.O. No.: 4, 9 January 1946.
    Citation:
    He was pinned down with other members of his company during an attack against strong enemy positions in the vicinity of Untergriesheim, Germany. Heavy artillery, mortar, and machinegun fire made any move hazardous when he stood up, shouted to the company to follow, and ran forward in the wake of a supporting tank, firing his machine pistol. Inspired by his example, his comrades advanced in the face of savage enemy fire. When his weapon was struck by shrapnel and rendered useless, he climbed to the deck of a friendly tank, manned an exposed machinegun on the turret of the vehicle, and, while bullets rattled about him, fired at an enemy emplacement with such devastating accuracy that he killed or wounded at least 10 hostile soldiers and destroyed their machinegun. Maintaining his extremely dangerous post as the tank forged ahead, he blasted 3 more positions, destroyed another machinegun emplacement and silenced all resistance in his area, killing at least 3 and wounding an undetermined number of riflemen as they fled. His machinegun eventually jammed; so he secured a submachinegun from the tank crew to continue his attack on foot. When our armored forces exhausted their ammunition and the order to withdraw was given, he remained behind to help a seriously wounded comrade over several hundred yards of open terrain rocked by an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage. By his intrepidity and inspiring courage Pfc. Colalillo gave tremendous impetus to his company's attack, killed or wounded 25 of the enemy in bitter fighting, and assisted a wounded soldier in reaching the American lines at great risk of his own life.

    I have had the honor to meet Mr Colalillo. He currently resides in Duluth MN. In fact he was the one who presented me with my Reserve Officer's Association JROTC Award
     
  10. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    Medal of Honor: Former President Harry S. truman, presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Michael Colalillo.
     

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  11. Audie Murphy crash site

    From the book James Dean Died Here.
    Blackburg, Virgina near Roanoke

    Directions to reach the site from the town of Blackburg.
    Take main street to Mount Tabor Road (also known as route 624).
    Go 12 miles just past Route 650 and turn left onto a gravel road (FSP 188.1).
    Continue on 1.8 miles then turn right at the top of Brush Mountain.
    Continue on 1.6 miles to the parking lot gate.

    On May 28th, 1971 Audie Murphy died in a plane crash on the slopes of Brush Mountain. He was the most decorated US GI of WWII.

    After the war he stayed in the public eye, writing his memoirs To Hell and Back, and starring in over 40 films. The Veterans of Foreign Wars erected a monument to Audie Murphy's memory here on the crash site as a tribute to the much decorated patriot. The trail behind the monument leads to a sceinic overlook with breathtaking views of Sinking Creek Valley.

    He is one of my heros.
     
  12. Marine1

    Marine1 Guest

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    Thanks Capt'n, for this information...:) He's one of my hero's, too!
     
  13. Audie Murphy's gravesite is the second most visited grave in Arlington National Cemetary. Second only to John F Kennedy's grave.

    Audie Murphys movie To Hell and Back was Universal Studios number one selling movie until they released the movie Jaws.
     
  14. Great thread to honor these people . . .

    yet we must remember there were many acts of sacrifice and courage that went unrewarded.

    So many heroes from such an important time in history.
     
  15. sealbeachbum

    sealbeachbum Guest

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    Albert E Schwab (my Uncle)

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Albert Schwab was just five days short of having one year in the Marine Corps the day he fearlessly walked into a blazing Japanese machine gun on Okinawa. He destroyed two guns that day and subsequently took his place on that highest pedestal the Marine Corps reserves for its Medal of Honor winners.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Albert Earnest Schwab was born July 17, 1920 in Washington, D.C., the son of George Albert Schwab and the late Mrs. Schwab. His father was born at Charleston, West Virginia, while his mother was a native of Minnesota.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The family moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma, early in Schwab's life, and he attended the local schools, graduating from Tulsa High School in 1937. After one semester at Tulsa University, the young athlete went to work for an oil company. Schwab was married on October 21, 1939 to the former Kathryn Ellen Schlosser of Tulsa. Their son, Steven Albert, was born September 1, 1942.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Inducted into the Marine Corps on May 12, 1944, Schwab was sent to boot camp in San Diego. His boot leave of ten days was the only time his family was to see him in the Marine uniform. After his furlough, the former oil worker went to the 2d Training Battalion at Camp Pendleton, California. In November, Private Schwab was transferred to the 13th Replacement Draft and on the twelfth of that month departed for overseas duty aboard the USS Wharton. He joined the 1st Marine Division at Pavuvu Island, in the Russells, and was assigned to Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines. On December 24, Schwab was promoted to private first class and in February, he, along with the rest of the division, embarked for maneuvers which eventually led to an enemy landing on the shores of Okinawa on Easter Sunday, April 1, 1945.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Private First Class Schwab was a flame thrower operator with Headquarters Company. When that company was pinned down in a valley on May 7 by the withering fire of a machine gun coming from a ridge high to the company's front, the Oklahoman scaled the cliff in the face of the devastating fire and attacked the gun with his flame thrower. Quickly demolishing the position and its crew, his company was able to occupy the ridge. Suddenly a second machine gun opened fire inflicting more casualties on the unit. Although he had not had time to replenish his supply of fuel, PFC Schwab unhesitatingly advanced on the second gun and succeeded in eliminating it before its final burst caught him in the left hip, inflicting fatal wounds.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The Medal of Honor was presented to Private First Class Schwab's three-year-old son at Boulder Park in Tulsa on Memorial Day, 1946, by Rear Admiral J.J. Clark, USN, Commanding the Naval Air Basic Training Command, Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]PFC Schwab's body was returned to the United States and buried with full military honors at Memorial Park, Tulsa, February 27, 1949. On October 3, 1959, a Marine camp constructed on Okinawa was named Camp Schwab in honor of the heroic Marine.[/FONT]​
    [​IMG]
     
  16. karakusars

    karakusars Guest

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    You forum very nice nmbd

    Hello. And Bye. Sex love for allr. Very sory from poland . Sex
     
  17. .22hustler

    .22hustler G&G Evangelist

    These guys are our real heroes, not the movie stars, the rappers, the rock and rollers, the pro atheletes, etc.Bless ALL our guys/gals in uniform...
     
  18. mtncrash1

    mtncrash1 G&G Enthusiast Forum Contributor

    This forum is like going to my Legion post. I get to learn lots of great stuff. Thanks to all who have contributed and a Big thank you to those who have served.
     
  19. karakusars

    karakusars Guest

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    You forum very nice nfgmbdtr

    Hello. And Bye. lovedff for allgdr. Very sory from poland . eyryer dfsrg ffggs
     
  20. karakusars

    karakusars Guest

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    You forum very nice nfgmbdtr

    Hello. And Bye. lovedff for allgdr. Very sory from poland . eyryer dfsrg ffggs