Would it function without the plunger

Discussion in '1911' started by PAPA G, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. PAPA G

    PAPA G G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    i know the purpose of the tube, i know they have to be restaked when its loose.

    but i was wondering, if the tube fell off, would the 1911 still function. ya never know when in the heat of battling Zombies you lose the tube.:eek:mfg:
     
  2. lefty o

    lefty o G&G Evangelist

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    properly staked, they will never come loose.
     

  3. M14man

    M14man I don't take prisoners... Forum Contributor

    Yes it would still function. It holds the safety in place and the slide release. Without it they could work them selves out, or the safety could flip on, or the slide could lock back like it does with the last shell, but if they did not get in that position, the gun would still fire. I have 8 -1911's and I have never had a problem with the tubes. I've had one 36 years. If you lost the slide release the barrel would not be locked in place, and the gun would not function. If the safety fell out, the gun would still function as long as your hand kept the grip safety from dislodging from it's location.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2010
  4. PAPA G

    PAPA G G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    well though rare there have been tubes coming off.

    but its good to know that when the Zombies are in the wire, i wouldn't have to call a ceasefire while having to find a gunsmith;)
     
  5. lefty o

    lefty o G&G Evangelist

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    im not saying tubes dont come off/loose. i am saying, if these companies that are cranking them out as fast as they can would take 2 extra seconds to do the job right, they would never come loose.
     
  6. SwedeSteve

    SwedeSteve Freedom Zealot Forum Contributor

    Have a pic of a properly done one ??
     
  7. Midas

    Midas Chief Troll B' Gone Forum Contributor

    This is a good question, seeing as how I have come across a few threads about Kimber and Springfield 1911's falling apart, the plunger tube being one of the main culprits.
     
  8. M14man

    M14man I don't take prisoners... Forum Contributor

    Kind of hard to photograpg, the camera was blocking the sunlight. It is flared by a tool with a cone point.
    Here are two photos of a Colt series 70.
    By the way, that is a brass ramp that extends a little rearward to help preveny bullet nosedives. It really helps with the reliability. Was done in the mid 70's.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 22, 2010
  9. Triumph05

    Triumph05 G&G Newbie

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    Besides flaring inside the frame, I also add a drop of Loc-tite on each of the "legs".