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What makes history interesting is that it can sometimes be downright odd. As one of the most dramatic and shattering events in human history, WWII is ripe with oddities. Following are a handful you may find interesting, and if you have others to share please do so.

It is a largely unknown fact that, just prior to WWII, the US Army’s 45th Infantry Division wore a swastika for a shoulder patch. Well, sort of. The symbol was identical to the Nazi swastika, except the colors were yellow on a red background. For the 45th Infantry Division the “swastika” was a Native American symbol honoring the states of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Colorado, and Arizona where most of the division’s soldiers came from. The shoulder patch was officially changed to a thunderbird symbol in 1939.
Until the United States entered the war against Germany on December 11, 1941, Hitler's personal train was called "Amerika." That changed in a hurry.
One of the first things Allied troops did when they finally reached Germany’s Rhine River in 1945 was to urinate in it. This act of defiance was led by the famous American general, George Patton. There are pictures showing Patton on the American-built pontoon bridge, known by soldiers as “Jackpot Bridge,” urinating into the Rhine.
When the United States Navy was attacked by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 it was under Commander In Chief, United States Fleet. The acronym for that command was CINCUS. CINCUS is pronounced, “sink us.”
3,800 Japanese Kamikaze pilots were infamous in the Pacific Theatre for steering their bomb-laden planes directly into American warships, and committing suicide in the process. Less well known are the Russian pilots that effectively did the same thing to German aircraft on the Eastern Front. There are at least 270 documented cases of Russian pilots purposefully ramming into German planes in the air, seven on the very first day of the Nazi invasion. One such ram was carried out by a woman pilot in September 1941, Ekaterina Zelenko in an SU-2 bomber. She first destroyed one German fighter in aerial combat, then rammed into the second, destroying both planes.
 

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Along with historical oddities, some of the slang terms/sayings that came out of WWII are kind of funny. Examples:

Admiral Of The Swiss Navy (to describe a self-important person)
Communal Grave For Seven (a Soviet army term for American M3 tanks sent to Russia under lend lease)
Whistle Berries and Tube Steaks (Army term for meal of beans and hot dogs)
Swacked (to be intoxicated)
Rationed (to be going steady, as in “Hey sugar, are you rationed?”)
Misery Pipe (a bugle)
Juice Jerker (an electrician)
Head Up And Locked (a person reacting stupidly during an emergency who "had his head locked up his a-hole")
Goo And The Moo (pancakes [or waffles], syrup, and milk)
Day the Eagle Sh!t (pay day)
 

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Along with historical oddities, some of the slang terms/sayings that came out of WWII are kind of funny. Examples:

Admiral Of The Swiss Navy (to describe a self-important person)
Communal Grave For Seven (a Soviet army term for American M3 tanks sent to Russia under lend lease)
Whistle Berries and Tube Steaks (Army term for meal of beans and hot dogs)
Swacked (to be intoxicated)
Rationed (to be going steady, as in “Hey sugar, are you rationed?”)
Misery Pipe (a bugle)
Juice Jerker (an electrician)
Head Up And Locked (a person reacting stupidly during an emergency who "had his head locked up his a-hole")
Goo And The Moo (pancakes [or waffles], syrup, and milk)
Day the Eagle Sh!t (pay day)

You forgot my dads favorite "S#!T On A Shingle" (creamed beef on toast)
He was a cook in the army air corps in the pacific & he fixed it for us about once a week.
 

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You forgot my dads favorite "S#!T On A Shingle" (creamed beef on toast)
He was a cook in the army air corps in the pacific & he fixed it for us about once a week.
My Dad made it too. He was exAirforce. He'd add sausage and white cheese to it. Really good "comfort food"!
 

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My basic training unit didn't know how to cook it! I went hungry those days.:( I don't know what they did to it, but I couldn't eat it. My wife has fixed it & it was good!
 

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SOS is done in as many ways as people who cook it. Basically, mod it to suit your taste! There ain't one "right way" to make it. 😎
 
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SOS is done in as many ways as people who cook it. Basically, mod it to suit your taste! There ain't one "right way" to make it. 😎
Yeah, I always thought SOS was basically Watchagot Stew when you had access to meat and bread.
 

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SOS for us was a hamburger tomato type sauce on toast.

Creamed chipped beef on toast was “creamed foreskins”. (Always served on Wednesdays....ironically sickbay did circumcisions on Tuesdays! And that is an honest fact).
 

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SOS for us was a hamburger tomato type sauce on toast.

Creamed chipped beef on toast was “creamed foreskins”. (Always served on Wednesdays....ironically sickbay did circumcisions on Tuesdays! And that is an honest fact).
I've had a bunch of versions of SOS.

A local diner used to sell it as chipped beef on toast, and it was incredible. It was usually made with corned beef and had a very slight Cajun spice to the gravy.

The other version was like a Watchagot Stew on bread made out of meat, powdered milk, and stuff the "chef" had brought or found that would go together.

We ate a version at Ghetto High, too. Their version was mystery meat and a little bit of potato in a creamy white sauce on toast. There was a similar thing called "meat loaf" (not to be confused with meatloaf, which was edible) which was the same mystery meat, but in a flavorless brown sauce with a little rice, dumped over a dinner roll, a third version of this same meat marketed to us as "Salisbury Steak" which was just a larger piece of the same mystery meat and brown gravy, without any of the add-ins. This was served with instant mashed potatoes and peas. The potatoes were so thick you could stab it with the handle of your plastic spoon, and catapult peas across the table.
By sheer coincidence, the day after "Salisbury steak" we always had one of the other two dishes. Similarly, the day after Taco day was sloppy Joe day, and the day after hamburger day was basically Salisbury steak, but with chopped up, dried out, hamburger patties instead of mystery meat. This last one was inevitably served with a scoop of over-cooked rice with some milk poured over the top and a small scoop of corn, with milk also poured over the top.
The rumor at the time was that local prisons had been told they had to serve better food to the inmates, so the leftover institutional food was sent to schools instead.

My kids go to a good school, and I often look at their lunch menus and feel jealous - not just of what I had to eat in school, but of what I usually get to eat for lunch now. When I have eaten lunch with them, I am not only surprised that the dishes are recognizable as things one might choose to eat, but that school meats come in normal colors rather than jaundice yellow, pea-soup green, British Army beige, or grey.
 
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