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I have a revolver that I inherited from my grandfather. I sat down one night to give it a good cleaning and do some reaserch. I decided that it was a S&W 1917. Here is the strange part that has me scratching my head. It will not take a standard .38 cartridge. It is too long. The interior of the cyclinder has a ridge at the end which keeps the .38 cartridge from going in. I know it is not fitting right becuase these same rounds I bought fit my .38 Taurus just fine.

Anyone have any ideas? I would like to fing out the approximate worth for insurance purposes. My grandpa probably picked it up in canada, but we are not completely sure. He died without explaining it. :feedback:
 

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ya gotta camera? photos help a LOT!:burnout:
 

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It may be chambered for 38 Colt(also know as .38LongColt)or 38 S&W. That "Ridge" you see in th echamber is where the cartridge headspaces, you look at the chamber of a 45ACP pistol you'll notice that same ridge.

Additionally there ain't no such critter as a "Standard 38 cartridge" what your Taurus is chambered for is .38 S&W Special.
 

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I believe Ezearln Hit it on the head !
Early Smiths were chambered for .38 S&W cartridge which has been known by the names"38 colt new police", 38 super police, and 38/200.
Cases measure .775 inches Overall length, fires a 146 grain lead bullet.
Rich
 

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After some contemplation about my old brain needing a new hard drive,I took a shower and went and Googled the S&W 1917 glade I did my hard drive is running well.
The 45 ACP was all I could find.
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[edit] Colt M1917 revolver

Colt had until recently produced a revolver for the U.S. Army called the M1909, a version of their heavy-frame, .45-caliber, New Service model in .45 Long Colt to supplement and replace a range of 1890s-era .38 Long Colt Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers that had demonstrated inadequate stopping power during the Philippine-American War. The Colt M1917 Revolver was essentially the same as the M1909 with a cylinder bored to take the .45 ACP cartridge and the half-moon clips to hold the rimless autopistol rounds in position. In the early Colt production revolvers, attempting to fire the .45 ACP without the half-moon clips was unreliable at best, as the cartridge could slip forward into the cylinder and away from the firing pin. The later production Colt M1917 revolvers had headspacing machined into the cylinder chambers, just as the Smith & Wesson M1917 revolvers had from the start. The later versions of the Colt production could be fired without the half-moon clips, but the empty cartridge cases had to be ejected with a device such as a cleaning rod or pencil, as the cylinder extractor and ejector would pass over the rims of the rimless cartridges.
 

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The ACP wouldn't explain why the .38 wasn't long enough though...the .38 case would also probably fall through the cylinder bore if it was chambered for a .45

I'd say Moose and Ezerln probably have it right. :)
 

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How much differents is there between a 32 Police Positive cartridge and the 38 cartridges ???
My Mother has a 32 p.p colt pistol in this chambering...A.H
 

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Sounds like you have a Military and Police chambered for 38 S&W. These were basically a model 10, and plenty were produced for the Brits under lend-lease. They loaded a heavier bullet and called the cartridge 38-200, otherwise it is same. By the way, Long Colt and New Police are both colt 38 offerings, but are not the same cartridge. Long Colt used a heal type bullet of larger diameter, and New Police was simply 38 S&W with a flat point bullet and the Colt name. I have a M&P lend lease marked U S property, nice shooter, and a Police Positive, which I like, though it raps my knuckles painfully unless I hold rather awkwardly to keep out of the way of the trigger guard.
 

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There used to be a cartridge "Interchangeability chart" that was as I recall put out by I think remington that told what you could fire in what and what you could not. Wonder if anyone here still has one of those?
 

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What is the serial number? Open the cylinder and look at the frame just above the pivot point. You may have a 1899 hand ejector,1902, or 1905 or any of several other models that were produced over the years. Just looking at a picture is hard to tell, as they all look similar in photos. I have a 1903 2'nd change and a 1905 3'rd change, and while the photos look alike, the frames are different sizes! It could also be a model 11, 38/200 British Service Revolver. You might try taking it to a gun shop and see if they can identify it for you.
 

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If it was a .45 ACP, the .38 would fall clear through,. It must be the .38 S&W cartridge. I had an Enfield in the Webley design that used them. The gun store I bought it at had a box of .38 S&Ws, aka .38 shorts. Don't know if they are still manufactured and might be a little hard to find. Might find them at a gun show.
Might even be a .32-20.
 
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