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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I hope I am not repeating a post and searched but couldn't find the info I was looking for. I have a Yugo M-48 and had it out at the range the other day. I was shooting surplus ammo and after about 20 or 25 rounds the action got really tight and the bolt became hard to operate to eject the spent shell. It cycled fine when loading the new round but it was a bear to open. I had it checked by a gunsmith before shooting as the rifle is new to me so I don't think there should be any safety issues. Once I got it home and cleaned it worked just fine so I don't know if it was from the rifle heating up. Any advise how to get this darn thing cycling better would be appreciate.

Cheers
South
 

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Was the ammo you were using lacquered (the casing has a glossy greenish finish)? Romanian 8mm is lacquered, at least the stuff I have is.

If so, the lacquer can begin to stick to the chamber when the rifle heats up and can cause extraction difficulties, especially if there is any residual cosmoline left in the chamber.

Give the chamber a thorough cleaning to remove any cosmoline or lacquer buildup. Some people use a shotgun bore brush to accomplish this.

One last thing, treat all surplus ammo as corrosive and clean accordingly.
 

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Sticky Bolt Lives!

Well, this kind of rings the "sticky bolt" syndrome bell common of Mosin Nagant rifles. If you haven't done so already, I would advise stripping your bolt down, and making sure any and all cosmolene has been removed from it. Inside and out. Mineral spirits, carb cleaner, brake kleen would all be good candidates to do this job. I like to use mineral spirits, and drop all the bolt parts that will fit in to a Gatorade jug (or any jug with a wide mouth and a lid to fit on it), filling the jug a quarter or so full of mineral spirits, and shaking, letting sit, shaking, letting sit etc. Repeat for a half hr or something. If you have stuff to do, shake it, lay it down sideways (be sure your lid doesn't leak) so the spirits soak the bolt parts and come back later. If there is still anything left on any bolt parts, an old toothbrush (or any brush anyways) usually does the trick. Just dunk it in your jug, and work it off any bolt parts. Then dry off all the mineral spirits, reoil, reassemble and test. If you have done this already, try the following...

A small inspection mirror would come in handy at this time. If you don't have one, then owell. Stick your pinky up in the chambering area where the bolt lugs engage the receiver to lock it down when you close the bolt on a round. Rub your pinky around, trying to get it in all the cracks and crevasses inside there. Maybe try a patch on your pinky to see if anything nasty comes out. If there is residue, or any type of gunk, or nast in there, you will want to get rid of it. Soak a patch in mineral spirits or the before mentioned substances (or whatever you have you like to use like Hoppes or whatever gun cleaner) and try to get every corner, crack, crevass, shoulder, hump (insert adjective) clean. Resort to Qtips, dental picks, wire cleaners, toothpicks or anything else you can think of to work in there to make sure every last drop of nast is out of that area where the bolt head travels. You could even plug the chamber with a cork or something and squirt some carb cleaner, brake kleen (or whatever chemical you have) and let it soak for a bit if you sit the rifle vertical or laying upside down on a gun vice. In my experience, a few squirts of brake kleen into the bolt head area directly on any gunk with the little straw usually does the trick. Let it sit a few, then squirt again. But, I forewarn you: REMOVE METAL FROM STOCK if you do attempt this method, and try to make an effort not to get any chemicals on your bluing or metal finish to help preserve it. Brake kleen has no remorse for stock finishes. Trust me. But it kills bees quite well. Auto paint too ;) If that doesn't work, try the following...

Especially if you are shooting lacquer coated ammo, any oils in the chamber will react with the pressures and heat created when a round is shot, especially if you heat your gun up shooting quite a bit. Make sure the area of the chamber where the bullet goes when you close the bolt on a round is good and clean. Take a brush like a .20 ga. or .45 cal pistol brush or something of the like (and you can even chuck it in a drill if you have a section of a cleaning rod) and put some of your mineral spirits, gun cleaner, whatever on the brush, and do it on a patch, and clean it out. A degreasing chemical like mineral spirits, brake kleen or even alcohol soaked in to the patch does a pretty good job at getting rid of any residual chemicals too. Finish it off with a clean dry patch to hopefully be done! This is the best you can do really short of polishing parts on your bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hey guys it wasn't that green ammo. I learned my lesson using that type of ammo in my cz82. I cleaned the hell out of it (or thought I did) after I shot it but I will try to get in there more throughly asap. It might be a couple of days before I get back on (family in town) but thank you all for the advice.

Cheers and happy Thanksgiving.
South
 

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The 20 gauge wirebrush/cleaningrod section. drill thing worked well for me in my Mosins. But my K98 has never had to eat corrosive stuff as I was reloading for it on day one.
 

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Hi all,
I hope I am not repeating a post and searched but couldn't find the info I was looking for. I have a Yugo M-48 and had it out at the range the other day. I was shooting surplus ammo and after about 20 or 25 rounds the action got really tight and the bolt became hard to operate to eject the spent shell. It cycled fine when loading the new round but it was a bear to open. I had it checked by a gunsmith before shooting as the rifle is new to me so I don't think there should be any safety issues. Once I got it home and cleaned it worked just fine so I don't know if it was from the rifle heating up. Any advise how to get this darn thing cycling better would be appreciate.

Cheers
South
Hi all,
I hope I am not repeating a post and searched but couldn't find the info I was looking for. I have a Yugo M-48 and had it out at the range the other day. I was shooting surplus ammo and after about 20 or 25 rounds the action got really tight and the bolt became hard to operate to eject the spent shell. It cycled fine when loading the new round but it was a bear to open. I had it checked by a gunsmith before shooting as the rifle is new to me so I don't think there should be any safety issues. Once I got it home and cleaned it worked just fine so I don't know if it was from the rifle heating up. Any advise how to get this darn thing cycling better would be appreciate.

Cheers
South
 
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